The Garden Forums

Dig In!
It is currently Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:11 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Cardiocrinum bulb
PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 9:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
Well, I went ahead and dug up the bulb and it was intact, about the size of a tulip bulb. I replanted it in an area where it will get a bit more sun, and the soil is more friable. Does anyone know the size of a blooming bulb?

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 11:24 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2006 12:09 pm
Posts: 569
Hi Susan, A blooming size bulb will be atleast as big as a good size fist up to the size of a pineapple......I would estimate you are likely 3-4 years from blooming if all goes well. I dug some of mine out of pots and tossed them in the ground a week ago because I was tired of fiddling with them (once I have seen a plant bloom a few times I get bored with it). The ones that bloomed this year had offsets the size of yours while the bulbs that bloomed were easily 10 times that size in terms of mass...maybe that is an Underestimate......be patient :D Dan

_________________
Dan
Gibsonia, PA
zone 6a


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 1:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
After 6 years, I thought I HAD been patient, Dan! LOL! It was just obviously in the wrong location, underfertilized probably, and bad soil. I finally decided I had nothing to lose by replanting in another spot with better soil, light, and I pledge to fertilize it more often.

What little foliage it has produced usually dies back by late July or August. The bulb looked healthy, so in that respect I decided to give it another chance. Whoa, obviously it has a long way to go to be a fist-sized bulb. What suggestions do you have to increase the bulb size - slow release bulb food (I usually use that) in organic form? Or, high phosphorous liquid food weekly or bi-weekly? Should I put some bulb food on it now? Several thick roots came up with the bulb, which I left intact when I replanted.

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 3:19 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2006 12:09 pm
Posts: 569
Hi Susan,

They do like pretty deep shade or at most a bit of early morning sun. Honestly, mine are planted in very rich loam (all decomposed leaves) and I do not bother to fertilize them or at most once or twice a summer if I am fertilizing things around them. The ones in pots used to get fertilized a few times every summer as they were in a better location for me to fiddle with them. I think if you have them situated better now they will take off for you and once they are happy the bulbs can increase dramatically in size over a single growing season. Best of luck :D Dan

_________________
Dan
Gibsonia, PA
zone 6a


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 4:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
Thanks, Dan, I knew you would come thru with answers for me!

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 2:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:52 am
Posts: 1782
Location: UK
I don't fertilise mine but the soil is reasonably fertile. There used to be an Elder tree there, renowned for loving rich soil, and it was rampant, perhaps that spot is within root reach of the compast heap. I suspect the longer you can keep it alive into the summer the better for growth. They survive right through to autumn here but look pretty awful by the end of summer. The one that flowered this year is pretty much defoliated now, a 15' stick with seedpods at the top.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 5:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
Interesting, S&B! I remember your images of that fantastic plant! I'm sure they probably like your all round environment better than mine. But, I'm persisting until at the very minimum, the bulb rots.

It is in a much more fertile bed now. One that I built in a lasagna fashion, by using brown paper bags on the bottom layer, then a mixture of peat, garden soil, and chicken manure. If it doesn't like that, I really don't know what else to do for it, except either let it die, or give it away to someone in a cooler region.

I'll give it a couple of years to reconstitute itself, and then it will be "bye bye".

The leaves on this plant usually die back in August. This year, unfortunately, it was much earlier because of the heat and drought the garden suffered - not just this plant, but many, many, many.

Most of them have just gone dormant due to conditions they could not possibly tolerate, and will return next year. Since we are in an El Nino pattern, I may have to deal with the same issues next summer. Who knows?

Thanks for all the great info. It may get more sun in this location than it really wants, but I don't have any other place to put it.

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 6:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:38 pm
Posts: 187
Location: OX, UK
Couldn't you try growing it in a pot? I grew c. cathayanum, a flowering size bulb bought from eBay, in a pot this year and stability issues aside didn't have any problems, i've yet to discover if its produced any good offsets.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 7:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
Phil, did it flower? What size was the bulb when you got it? I'm just wondering what size a "flowering size" really is. Bigger than a tulip bulb?

I may just put it in a pot next summer if it doesn't get any larger. I think our heat may have something to do with it, too.

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 7:42 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:38 pm
Posts: 187
Location: OX, UK
I'm afraid it was very much an 'uge bulb, i don't remember how large exactly but certainly bigger than fist sized, the flowers were magnificent, so when the seller gets them in again i've a feeling we'll be getting another, my gf's grandmother had fun showing it off to the neighbours :)

Of course it has to be said, i didn't put any real effort into this so i've technically cheated here. I don't know how well smaller bulbs will bulk up if grown in pots but i'd certainly try that option as a way to ensure you can control watering/feeding and give it some nice rich compost, you can also cart it around and stick it in the shade if it seems to be sulking.

Whatever you decide to try next, good luck.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 8:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2006 12:09 pm
Posts: 569
Hi Swallowtail, As I have said many times I grew a 9-12 foot tall Cardiocrinum giganteum to flowering size in a pot no problem at all.....these are easy plants in pots and you should not hesitate at all. I had 3 of them this year in a 24" pot with 3 spikes easily at 9 feet plus....I did not measure them but you could go up on the 10 foot tall deck to smell the flowers if that gives you any idea. The other species mentioned is smaller in stature of course and would be easier in a smaller pot. Do not despair :D Dan

_________________
Dan
Gibsonia, PA
zone 6a


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
Thanks for the info, guys. Now, my next questions is, would it overwinter in a pot outdoors in my zone 7? Or, would it be better to bring the pot indoors, keep in on the dry side in a cool room, and then take it back outside when the temps warm up in spring?

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:09 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2006 12:09 pm
Posts: 569
Hi Swallowtail, The ones I've had in pots I have put in my garage for the winter with the occassional touch of water to keep it from drying out like a bone!! The ones I import every year I keep in barely damp potting mix so that I can get rid of them the following spring. I am sure you will have no problems with yours :D Dan

_________________
Dan
Gibsonia, PA
zone 6a


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 4:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
Thanks, Dan. Knew I could count on your expert advice. I also have a phlomis tuberosa in a pot outside that I didn't get planted in the ground. Grown from seed; didn't flower this year; is perennial. I love the foliage on this plant despite it's lack of flower this year, and it's not unusual for a perennial grown from seed to take a couple of years to flower.

However, I don't know whether to bring it in (it's tuberous) and let it go dormant, or if I can just leave the pot outside during the winter and let it go dormant outside.

Does anyone know anything about this plant?

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2006 9:09 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Calgary, zone 3
Phlomis tuberosa is hardy here in zone 3, and even in zone 2, so in your zone, I wouldn't expect it to have any problem wintering over in a pot, so long as drainage is provided??


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2006 3:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:10 am
Posts: 793
Location: zone 7a-OKC
Yes, it's in a regular flower pot with drainage holes. I think it's so pretty. Do they multiply quickly, AB, once they're planted in the ground? I'm hoping this plant will provide nectar for the butterflies, too.

Susan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cardiocrinum bulb
PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 4:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2011 4:12 pm
Posts: 3
maybe a bit of a late reply 5 year later, but i thought i would post 1 anyway

cardiocrinum giganteum funnily enough does not produce huge bulbs. i have been growing them now for a number of years, as well as yunnanense and cathayanum.

a fully flowering sized giganteum is only about 6-7 cm's across

i will try and find a picture of a flowering sized bulb in a pot and upload it


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cardiocrinum bulb
PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2011 10:51 pm
Posts: 14
Location: Palm Beach Gardens
i think you should put it in a large pot.. so you can move it around easier. Yeah?

_________________
My name is Brad, and I live at the gardens - palm beach gardens. My goal is to be completely self sufficient and only buy some of my food from the local market. I currently run a real estate property listings website. Any tips are greatly appreciated.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group Maintained by Rewired Media