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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 6:53 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 5:22 pm
Posts: 107
Location: cortona tuscany italy
thanks to this forum! ando to the people that write there, in a fair yesterday i have find hippe papillo! is a so beautiful flower and is short and the flower are of the exact size i like!
just a question using papillo as moterplants can i save the fast grown and the dimension of flower?
have enibody made some cross like papillo x some modern ibrids?
some ideas about the ofspring?
thanks in advance for the help and reply!

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 6:56 am 
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Location: cortona tuscany italy
PS
dear Luar i have send you a pm, have you recived it?
best wishes
Emanuele

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 9:28 am 
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Location: Hong Kong
Hi Emanuele:

I have just sent you a pm, please check. Sorry for not answering your messages until now. I am happy that you have got a H. papilio bulb. 'Papilio' is really a beautiful species which grows naturally in the cool 'Atlantic Forest" in south-eastern Brasil. It does well for me in a semi-shady enviornment and enjoys good air circulation. During high summer, keep plant in a cool spot.

Ciao

Dennis


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 9:34 am 
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Amigos:

My Hippeastrum reginae ('Queen of Hippeastrum') bulbs are now flowering beautifully. This extremely eye-catching species would never fail to draw the attention of everybody! It is native mainly to Brasil but can also be found in Peru and Ecuador. In Brasil, bulbs are often found growing in margins of farmlands, cleared forests, etc. I have seen bulbs growing deep in the dark of a forest. I have never made any attempt to make seed of this species but the species produces offsets freely.

Enjoy!

Dennis


Attachments:
Hippeastrum reginae.jpg
Hippeastrum reginae.jpg [ 127.86 KiB | Viewed 1305 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 1:28 pm 
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Location: cortona tuscany italy
anoter time compliments are not enough for your flower and for the photos!
anoter beautiful plants!
thanks for your ints for papilio, if you dont advert me i've think to place it in ful sun :oops:
thanks anoter time!

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 7:14 am 
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Lovely reginae Dennis :D

Astrocortona, H. papilio is used routinely to make hybrids and has been crossed with H. cybister to make some lovely crosses. In general, I am not a big fan of hybrids so do not pay too much attention to them, but I'm sure papilio has been used extensively in hybridization. Best of luck with your new find and your attempts to cross :D Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:48 am 
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Location: Lebanon, IN USA
Luar wrote:
Amigos:

My Hippeastrum reginae ('Queen of Hippeastrum') bulbs are now flowering beautifully. This extremely eye-catching species would never fail to draw the attention of everybody! It is native mainly to Brasil but can also be found in Peru and Ecuador. In Brasil, bulbs are often found growing in margins of farmlands, cleared forests, etc. I have seen bulbs growing deep in the dark of a forest. I have never made any attempt to make seed of this species but the species produces offsets freely.

Enjoy!

Dennis



Dennis,

OM Goodness, just look at that throat! What wonderful contrast to the red petals that really offset it. I see, clearly, why it is called the "Queen of Hippeastrums".

Since this species produces offsets freely, is it generally available or is it another hard to find one? I do like this one, a lot!

I was also interested in what you had to say about papilio. My question about this frustrating species is how do you get the darned thing to bloom!?! I forget how many years I have had mine. It has produced 3 "pups" and one of those has been set to a friend and has already produced an off set for her and my "mother bulb" has a new "pup" to replace it already. These are not small bulbs, perhaps as big as a Valencia Orange or bigger. Mine grows actively in the winter months in my basement light garden while all my others are sleeping. It goes dormant in summer after I get all of my collection moved outside. When it starts I move it to a cool, shady spot. keep it watered with a total dry out in between. I think I have seen it bloom twice. I do use a slow release fertilizer on all of my hippies and re-pot as needed. H. papilio is in a rather large 2.5 gallon tub so it would have plenty of root room. While it grows happily, I just can't get it to bloom! HELP!

Rebecca

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 12:14 pm 
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Rebecca47 wrote:
I would like to try this pollen on my H.'Chico' that is about ready to bloom, if you think the pollen will remain viable long enough for the trip to the States.

I will chance up loading an image of a Tet Hemerocallis seedling of mine that has this stippled color....

there are registered cultivars out there with a much more modern "look" than mine, but I do this for fun, not for profit so "cutting edge" isn't all that important


Rebecca:

I love your Hemerocallis and the 'yellow heart' pattern in the centre of the flower draws my attention immediately I looked at the picture. The yellow heart looks perfect against the rust colour petals. The flower has got a great shape. In summary it is a great beauty! Please keep posting pictures of your Hemerocallis. Do you have any purplish / wine-red varieties?

Hemerocallis is still not popular as a gardening plant in Hong Kong. However, it is used mainly for medicinal and cooking. People use the flower buds mixed with different kinds of edible fungus and dates to make a stewed chicken dish but I hate the horrible taste of Day Lily flower buds and dates.

I have received your pm and shall ship the pollen to you asap. As the pollen is kept inside a plastic capsule with silica gel, I am sure it will survive the long trip to you.

Dennis


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 12:58 pm 
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Location: Lebanon, IN USA
Luar wrote:
Rebecca47 wrote:
I would like to try this pollen on my H.'Chico' that is about ready to bloom, if you think the pollen will remain viable long enough for the trip to the States.

I will chance up loading an image of a Tet Hemerocallis seedling of mine that has this stippled color....

there are registered cultivars out there with a much more modern "look" than mine, but I do this for fun, not for profit so "cutting edge" isn't all that important


Rebecca:

I love your Hemerocallis and the 'yellow heart' pattern in the centre of the flower draws my attention immediately I looked at the picture. The yellow heart looks perfect against the rust colour petals. The flower has got a great shape. In summary it is a great beauty! Please keep posting pictures of your Hemerocallis. Do you have any purplish / wine-red varieties?

Hemerocallis is still not popular as a gardening plant in Hong Kong. However, it is used mainly for medicinal and cooking. People use the flower buds mixed with different kinds of edible fungus and dates to make a stewed chicken dish but I hate the horrible taste of Day Lily flower buds and dates.

I have received your pm and shall ship the pollen to you asap. As the pollen is kept inside a plastic capsule with silica gel, I am sure it will survive the long trip to you.

Dennis


Dennis,

I can understand your aversion to cooked Daylily flowers/buds with dates. It's the dates that mess it up! Yuck! I have sampled raw daylily petals and find there is some slight difference in taste between the different cultivars. I feel this may go all the way back to the species used in the very beginning. Hem. fulva and some of it's varieties are often used for medicinal and cooking purposes, from what little I have read on this subject.

I have many different varieties of registered cultivars as well as seedling from my breeding program, unfortunately I do not have a up to date, current web site where you can see them all, but you can get an idea by checking this site: http://www.geocities.com/beccaslilies/index.html?1161699710720

One of my favorite really dark ones is this Tet seedling, it appears nearly black in the early morning light:

Attachment:
F18-SFXAPLO-GROUP.jpg
F18-SFXAPLO-GROUP.jpg [ 50.87 KiB | Viewed 2115 times ]


And here is one of my favorite of the Spider and Unusual Forms, also from my own breeding program:

Attachment:
B39_CSXSL-best.jpg
B39_CSXSL-best.jpg [ 43.7 KiB | Viewed 2112 times ]



This is not the proper forum to get me started "talking" about this. I am quite passionate about "my daylilies"!I had some very promising seedling to bloom for the first time last season and not a one made it through winter, others that had been planted out in the ground did make it though and they were not bad looking seedlings either! At least all was not lost to winter kill. I should add that the losses were plants grown in containers, a regular practice, but this was a very bad late winter and conditions arose that were not good for container plants. I may replace some of the plants that were lost as well as re-make some of the crosses. I may not.

Looking for to getting the Hippie pollen! 'Chico' is opening it's first of four buds today, so hopefully the pollen will arrive in time! I am going to be using the saved 'Ruby Meyers' pollen on two blooms and this species pollen on the other two. Ought to give some interesting offspring! Will let you know when it arrives so you can make note of the info.


Rebecca
Lebanon, IN USA
Zone 5

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:17 pm 
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Hi folks:

It has been a while since I posted the last time. This time, I would like to share with you photos of Hippeastrum evansiae which is a great beauty from mountains in the vicinity of Cochabamba, Bolivia.

Hippeastrum evansiae is one of the very few yellow / creamy white species among the Hippeastrums. It is a highly variable species which comprises forms of different shades, shapes, flower sizes, number of flowers per stalk, flowering time, etc. I have got 7 different forms (clones), each of these clones has distinct features.

In terms of size of bulb and height of plant, Hippeastrum evansiae is considered a medium-size species. In the natural habitats, bulbs are partially above soil level. Unlike any other species, Hippeastrum evansiae multiplies vegetatively by developing rhizomatous roots / stolens at the end of which new bulbs develop. As such, I grow bulbs in large containers to ensure there is always room for the rhizomatous roots.

Hippeastrum evansiae is an evergreen species though it goes through a brief quasi-dormant period during winter time when watering should be withheld. However, even during growing season, bulbs should not be over-watered as the species is native to dry mountain slopes.

Hippeastrum evansiae is a self-sterile species. However, I have tried cross-pollinated among different clones but never had luck making seed either. Therefore, the species multiplies only vegetatively.

I attach below photos of the following clones:
- "Clone B" : large light yellow flowers, broad petals with red star, 2 flowers per stalk
- "Clone C" : large creamy white flowers, broad petals without red star, 2 flowers per stalk
- "Clone G" : medium size dark yellow flowers, spidery petals with light red star, 2-3 flowers per stalk

Just a side issue, I have cross-pollinated Griffinia gardneriana with Hippeastrum evansiae, let's see if the Hippeastrum evansiae will take this time.

Happy Easter holidays!

Dennis


Attachments:
Hippeastrum evansiae Clone B.jpg
Hippeastrum evansiae Clone B.jpg [ 113.5 KiB | Viewed 1312 times ]
Hippeastrum evansiae Clone C - 03.jpg
Hippeastrum evansiae Clone C - 03.jpg [ 85.63 KiB | Viewed 1300 times ]
Hippeastrum evansiae Clone G.jpg
Hippeastrum evansiae Clone G.jpg [ 72.85 KiB | Viewed 1302 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:11 pm 
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Luar, the clone 'B' is really wonderful....they are all nice, but 'B' really stands out for me!!

Let me know if you got my last e-mail about RSA plants.....I can ask for you and perhaps help out if at all possible :D Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 10:39 am 
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Location: cortona tuscany italy
:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
realy a piece of art, this plants a re a god reason to grown species and not ibrids!
for my heyes this species realy are a step up all the ibrid i have ever see.....
a beautiful surprise for heaster to everybody!

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:27 am 
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Location: Lebanon, IN USA
Species, be they Hippeastrums or Hemerocallis or any other plant one collects/grows belong in the garden (or wherever the plants are grown/maintained) if only to so people from whence the modern hybrid came.

All species have an elegance about them that is often lost in the hybrids. Other traits are also either lost or bred out. This can be good and bad. With our hippies, ease of culture has been bred in through selective breeding, but in so many cases a lot of the elegance and charm of the species has been bred out.

Daylily breeders, especially though would work with the Spider and Unusual Forms have begun to breed back to certain species to regain many characteristics as well as hardiness and hybrid vigor. We are also finding that breeding back to the species can often unlock many secrets/surprised. One of them being patterned eye zones and the color blue (in the eye zone).

I do not see why breeding back to certain of the Hippeastrum species couldn't do the same. A good example is the cybister hybrids. Granted they are not for everyone, but they would reach a population that heretofore was not interested in Hippeastrums. This is a good thing. Awareness brings about conservation and isn't that what we are all after?


I can not really pick a favorite from these clones of Hippeastrum evansiae, as all are equally beautiful, but I do tend to lean more towards B", but only because it shows what I want to accomplish in my Spider/Unusual Form Hemerocallis breeding program. Pristine white petals, diamond dusted and a lovely , apple green throat. This is as close as I've gotten so far!
Attachment:
File comment: Snowbird Song X Made in Dixie. Pod parent was near white, while the pollen parent was a melon polychrome. Bloom is 7+ inches on 34 inch scapes with multiple branches and an unknown bud count - I haven't recorded that info yet. Oops!
E34_SSXMID-1.jpg
E34_SSXMID-1.jpg [ 55.74 KiB | Viewed 2084 times ]





Rebecca

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:56 pm 
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Rebecca and astrocortona:

Your Daylilies are absolutely gorgeous - unusal shades too! It is most difficult for me to pick my favourite one. I have never imagined that Daylilies come in so many colours. In particular, your Snowbird Song X Made in Dixie resembles a Bauhinia blackeana. How big are the flowers? How many days do Daylilies usually last for? Please keep sharing your pictures, thanks. And if there is a variety with pristine white petals, diamond dusted and a lovely, apple green throat, please reserve one plant for me, thanks in advance :P .

Against the background that I have limited space, time, $$ and poor memory power to recall those hybrid names, I focus mainly species instead of hybrids. Besides, I find growing species a great challenge as they tend to be more difficult to be maintained than hybrids, and that I can relate species to their natural habitats thus making some excuse to go overseas. That said, I do grow a small number of Hippeastrum hybrids, including my all-time favourite "Picotee" (see old photo below). I cannot figure out how breeders manage to maintain the elegant red lines bordering the flower and what species they use for creating such a great beauty! "Cybister" certain enjoys a high potential for breeding for its unique spidery form. I believe that it might cross with Sprekelia formossisima and Hippeastrum angustifolium which would come up with a bright red spidery Hippeastrum.

Happy holidays!

Dennis


Attachments:
Hippeastrum Picotee.jpg
Hippeastrum Picotee.jpg [ 101.19 KiB | Viewed 2073 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 1:13 am 
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There are many similarities to be found in the Lily Family, for it is a rather large and diverse family of plants! Hippies are my winter time daylilies!

That seedling has blooms measuring between 7 and 8 inches and each bloom lasts only a day. The Latin name, Hemerocallis means "beauty for a day", hence the "common name" "DAYLILY". Fortunately this seedling (and all Daylilies) puts up multiple flowering scapes with many lateral branches and numerous buds so they do stay in bloom for several weeks.

I have both cultivars and seedlings and bloom sizes range from under 2 inches across to more than12 inches. Not to mention enough forms and petal shapes to boggle the mind!

I had 'Picotee' years ago, but it is not an easy one to find here in the states. Before I started breeding daylilies I didn't think too much about the whys and wherefores of the various flower colors regardless of the genus. since then though I have been surprised more than once by Mother Nature and the secrets she oft shares. One can not really tell by a plants (blooms) phenotype what lies within the genotype or what governs a particular genus's laws of color inheritance. I know it is not all that straight forward with Daylilies! Some traits take a combination of genetic modifiers in both dominant and recessive forms to allow them to come to the surface and be seen. I don't "get into" the technical terms of color pigments and the like, but with Daylilies, getting a true white is still several years away. Some many variables can govern the clarity of color, any color or, in the case of a pure white, the lack thereof. So to is the case of the picotee edge in hippies. It is not likely that the genes for striping within the body of the petals is the same gene(s) responsible for isolating the color only to the very thin edge. No others have been developed, or so it seems. And since no complete records are available on the parentage of the hybrids, we may never know what traits are passed on and to what extent. I will state, however, that certain traits do seem to come from particular species, the Cybister hybrids for example. Still, there seems to be many more of the cybister hybrids that have the widen petals than the really narrow ones of 'Chico' and 'Ruby Meyers'. It would seem that this narrow form can be bred away from within just a couple, maybe three generations. To me, that is a loss as I actually prefer the more "natural" forms of the species - Hippeastrums or Hemerocallis!


Rebecca

Attachment:
File comment: Front flower is the cultivar 'Starsearch' bred and registered by Dottie Warrell. Very close to true white. Blooms size is 7.5". The bloom in the background belongs to a seedling from Chesapeake Crablegs X Seedling (purchased seeds) ad this bloom measures approximately 9 inches with a "wingspan" of 12".
STRSRCH_C2-C2XSDLG.jpg
STRSRCH_C2-C2XSDLG.jpg [ 53.49 KiB | Viewed 2071 times ]

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:08 am 
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Hi Rebecca, I am going to totally rip out a bit of a perennial bed this fall and redo it. I am planning on purchasing some Peonies (Itoh hybrids) as well as a few Daylilies, Colchium, etc. Last year I traded a huge number of H. striatum and H. puniceum bulbs to get myself started with a few common old Peonies, some Daffodils and some Iris and I have a few standard Daylilies from the nurseries around here, but would like something more exotic. I am out of trade-bait so what is the best on-line nursery for getting some nice, unusual Daylilies? Thanks for any help in pointing me in the right direction :D Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 9:22 am 
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PA-Plantguy wrote:
Hi Rebecca, I am going to totally rip out a bit of a perennial bed this fall and redo it. I am planning on purchasing some Peonies (Itoh hybrids) as well as a few Daylilies, Colchium, etc. Last year I traded a huge number of H. striatum and H. puniceum bulbs to get myself started with a few common old Peonies, some Daffodils and some Iris and I have a few standard Daylilies from the nurseries around here, but would like something more exotic. I am out of trade-bait so what is the best on-line nursery for getting some nice, unusual Daylilies? Thanks for any help in pointing me in the right direction :D Dan



Dan,

You are in a good USDA Zone as there are several breeders/growers that jump into my mind! There's my friend, Paul Owens and his Slightly Different Gardens, he does mostly full form Tetraploids, but does have a few Diploids. Then there's Jim Murphy and Margo Reed at Woodhenge Gardens, they specialize in the Spider and Unusual Forms and Jim has several late season bloomers. (They also have a few species for sale occasionally). I have a few of theirs and just love them. John, Faye and Elizabeth Shooter have Marietta Gardens and breed a full range of colors and sizes as well as forms. I also have some of their introductions.

Of course I can't NOT tell you about my friends Brian Mahieu, who lives in Missouri and David and Laura Burris, who live in Kentucky. They became partners in this wonderful adventure a few years back when Brian needed a place to grow and sell his introductions. David was already running a Daylily farm and working his own breeding programs. Brina has some of the most cutting edge unusual form daylilies anywhere and works a lot with the species to recapture their essence into his breeding lines. Bluegrass Gardens Daylilies have a wide range of introductions from other hybridizers as well as their own creations.

Sources/Links:

http://www.mariettagardens.com/

http://www.woodhengegardens.com/

http://www.bluegrassgardens.net/

For your reading pleasure and to read about his intros (previous) you should check out Brian's site: http://www.brianmahieu.com/daylily/index.shtml

http://www.slightlydifferentnursery.com/site/index.php?main_page=index&zenid=ee6ce350a655b2f45940e242ea9ddbae


There are others, many, many others, but these will get you started! All also have other cultivars for sale, not just their own introductions. If you are not familiar with the "modern" hybrid Daylilies, these sources will blow you away! I know when I was first introduced to a daylily that wasn't a "Ditch Lily" or little 'Stella D'Oro I was! This happened to be 'White Temptation' a lovely near white! Wow! a WHITE daylily? I was hooked!

Here's one of my "orphaned" seedlings (parentage unknown) that I got from another breeder, more by accident as it was in a clump of another of his seedlings:

Attachment:
File comment: Bret's Surprise" is the garden name I gave this seedling so I could more easily keep track of it.
BRETS-SURPRISE-t.jpg
BRETS-SURPRISE-t.jpg [ 51.61 KiB | Viewed 2068 times ]


This one is a cute, small flowered, patterned eye intro from my friend Rick Yost:

Attachment:
george-jets-on-t-2.jpg
george-jets-on-t-2.jpg [ 54.07 KiB | Viewed 2068 times ]




Enjoy!


Rebecca

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:40 pm 
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Just a quick one: Hippeastrum vittatum - a great beauty native to jungles in eastern Peru. Details to follow.


Attachments:
Hippeastrum vittatum 02.jpg
Hippeastrum vittatum 02.jpg [ 894.2 KiB | Viewed 1300 times ]


Last edited by Luar on Tue Apr 21, 2009 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:34 am 
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Location: cortona tuscany italy
:shock:
O. M.G!
anoter beauty from your collection!
if is possible my admiration for hyppeastrum genus is bigger!
and for your collection to!
best regards
Emanuele

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 5:03 pm 
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Hi Rebecca, I looked at the sites you gave me.....lovely Daylilies!!!

Luar, nice H. vitatum. I've had this one for years and for some reason have never taken a pic of it in flower. I find this to be one of the easy ones for a species and I love it because it goes totally dormant for the winter which is a HUGE plus for me :D Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:14 pm 
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PA-Plantguy wrote:
Hi Rebecca, I looked at the sites you gave me.....lovely Daylilies!!!

Luar, nice H. vitatum. I've had this one for years and for some reason have never taken a pic of it in flower. I find this to be one of the easy ones for a species and I love it because it goes totally dormant for the winter which is a HUGE plus for me :D Dan



Dan,

Thank you! BTW, I now have 10 h. xstraitum babies growing happily in their little mini tent greenhouse! I believe that would be 100% germination rate!?!


Dennis,

I have seen other images of H. vittatum, and would LOVE to see this one of yours, but my antiquated dial up service and painfully slow machine won't even up load your image due to the file size. Don't suppose I could sweet talk you into compressing that file and trying it again, could I? Your photography is always do awesome!



Rebecca

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:29 pm 
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Rebecca, glad to hear they did well for you!!! These are pure species as it was simply a cross of two different clones of H. striatum I have originally from Mauro. I have had some of these flower in as little as 2 years so hopefully the wait will not be too long :D Dan

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Dan
Gibsonia, PA
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 3:50 pm 
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Posts: 51
Location: Lebanon, IN USA
PA-Plantguy wrote:
Rebecca, glad to hear they did well for you!!! These are pure species as it was simply a cross of two different clones of H. striatum I have originally from Mauro. I have had some of these flower in as little as 2 years so hopefully the wait will not be too long :D Dan



:wink: Dan,

It is great to know I can expect bloom so soon! I have had that happen with my "hybrids" as well having them take 4+ years to grace me with their presence!

BTW my use of the "x" is to indicate that these seedlings, though a true species are still from a cross of two different populations of this species. Is that not the correct use? Do you have the population numbers or reference ID for the ones used? I'd like to keep a record of this (for my own curiosity if no other reason).

Making a new topic to show an picture of my newest HYBRID seedling to bloom.


Rebecca

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Lebanon, IN USDA Zone 5
"Live Like You Were Dying"

http://beccasweirdart.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 8:53 pm 
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Luar wrote:
.


Luar-- that first photo is just incredible. Its like the flower glows!

Thanks for sharing,

Ryan


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 9:12 pm 
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Location: Wilkes Barre, PA
Luar- Still admiring that first one. very nice!
Rebecca those daylily links were bad news on a cold winter evening. I am seeing myself "needing" some of those Brian Mahieu hybrids, and I am not really a daylily lover at all!

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:45 am 
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Location: Lebanon, IN USA
Kato wrote:
Luar- Still admiring that first one. very nice!
Rebecca those daylily links were bad news on a cold winter evening. I am seeing myself "needing" some of those Brian Mahieu hybrids, and I am not really a daylily lover at all!




I think you will find Brian's introductions very NON-daylily like in appearance and having more of a "Tropical Flower" look. Sometimes a little slow to get established but once they are they seem to perform quite well.

I also think that the Spider and Unusual Forms will be much more interesting than the "normal" rounded forms - they all have an "exotic" look to them - much like the "Cybister Hybrid" Hippies.


Image

That was 'Chico' when it was just opening its blooms. I've pollinated 4 of the blooms and am in the hopeful stage of development. I used 'Evergreen' on two and 'Little Star' on the other two. The goal with the latter is to get small flowers on short(er) stems. I figure the flower form will be somewhere in between. Time will tell.


Rebecca

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Lebanon, IN USDA Zone 5
"Live Like You Were Dying"

http://beccasweirdart.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2010 6:50 pm 
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Location: Wilkes Barre, PA
Yes Rebecca, it's the spiders and unusual forms that I love.... not to be pushy, but if you are ever bored, I'd love to see more unusual daylily pictures! Thanks for letting me hijack the thread for a couple minutes btw! :oops:

I like the photo of Chico, but if I can be honest I've always thought the cybister blooms look kind of cheap relative to the plant. Either a larger bloom or smaller plant would seem more in scale to me. But wow, when you see a couple of them as cut flowers...... they are such an exotic form mixed with bold color!

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 12:14 pm 
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Location: Lebanon, IN USA
Kato wrote:
Yes Rebecca, it's the spiders and unusual forms that I love.... not to be pushy, but if you are ever bored, I'd love to see more unusual daylily pictures! Thanks for letting me hijack the thread for a couple minutes btw! :oops:

I like the photo of Chico, but if I can be honest I've always thought the cybister blooms look kind of cheap relative to the plant. Either a larger bloom or smaller plant would seem more in scale to me. But wow, when you see a couple of them as cut flowers...... they are such an exotic form mixed with bold color!


Feel free to browse these on line albums for both (my seedlings and others) .

http://picasaweb.google.com/home

http://community.webshots.com/user/Beccasdaylilies


Only one hippie blooming right now and it's about to finish up. It was supposed to be 'Ruby Meyers' but turned out to be 'Bogota', definitely not what I wanted, but not bad either!

Image

Image

'Evergreen' was pretty nice too and had much better deeper saturation) w/o flash or in person.

Image


Enjoy!


Rebecca

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http://beccasweirdart.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:40 am 
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very nice, thanks for the links. I'm going to need a lot more time to finish looking through them.

You are right, it's the spiders and unusual forms that I like!

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 9:27 pm 
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Hello everyone,

I am humbled by the glorious photography presented here. Despite my lack of expertise with a camera,
I want to share my excitement over the maiden blooming of a treasured and unusual member of my species bulbs collection: Griffiniopsis blumenavium. The subject of ongoing taxonomic debate being formerly known as Griffinia blumenavia, Hippeastrum blumenavium, and Eithea blumenavia; it is a tiny, precious, shade and water-loving jewel. With its white pollen and reticulated flowers, I think that its blooms resemble a miniature version of Hippeastrum reticulatum var. striatifolium. However, its delicate petiolate leaves lack the prominent white mid-rib stripe of H. reticulatum var. striatifolium.

Best regards,

Blanca


Griffiniopsis blumenavium
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