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 Post subject: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2009 1:41 pm 
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Location: Hong Kong
I am new to TGF and would like to take this opportunity to say 'hi' to everybody. I am a hobby gardener. My interests are basically bulbous plants and orchids and I maintain large collections of plants. I live in Hong Kong but my interests in plants have taken me to Africa and South America. To me, it is essential to learn how plant species adapt to the natural environment and how the natural habitats look like.

I attach below pictures of Hippeastrum neopardinum and Hippeastrum breviflorum (Clone 1) . Hippeastrum breviflorum is an aquatic species which enjoys warm sunny weather. Hippeastrum neopardinum is often considered identical to H. pardinum. It is native to intermontane valleys in Peru. The Hippeastrum breviflorum is raised from seed collected in southern Paraguay but the species is also native to swampy areas along water courses in NE Argentina and Brasil. The species is quite variable in colouration which ranges from pink with feathery lining, salmon pink, reddish/orange to almost creamy white.


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Hippeastrum neopardinum.jpg
Hippeastrum neopardinum.jpg [ 45.46 KiB | Viewed 7309 times ]
Hippeastrum breviflorum Clone 1.jpg
Hippeastrum breviflorum Clone 1.jpg [ 74.99 KiB | Viewed 4413 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:05 pm 
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Welcome to the forums, Luar! Thanks for introducing me to Hippeastrum. Sounds like you have had some amazing journeys when researching plants. I can't wait to hear more.

Foxy.


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2009 6:49 pm 
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Location: Ohio
Hi Luar:

Welcome to this forums. Your Hippeastrums are beautiful, wonderful habitat information!

There's a few persons quite dedicated to bulbs, I am sure you will have fun here. It sounds you have nice collections, we look forward more pics from you and wish you can share more of your knowledge with us in future.

Personally, I am just starter, have small collection, bulbs from Africa, mainly focuse on small groups of Amaryllidaceae species, such as Boophane (my favortie) and Brunsvigia, Haemanthus...

Yu


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Tue Feb 24, 2009 9:29 pm 
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Those area beautiful, as is your photography. Thanks for sharing them and welcome to TGF. I hope you'll show some of your orchids too and share your cultural knowledge. I look forward to seeing more of your collections.


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 3:34 am 
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Hello Foxy, Yu and Luv:

Hippeastrum is a fascinating group of plants which comprises some 50 species and subspecies. The species adapt to a wide variety of habitats from the high Andes (e.g. H. cybister and H. anzaldoi) to arid regions of Argentina and Bolivia (e.g. H. argentinum and H. parodii), tropical rainforests (e.g. H. ferreyrae and H. petiolatum), cool Atlantic forests (e.g. H. aulicum), to coastal seashores (e.g. H. blossfeldiae) and edge of river channels of the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela (H. doraniae). Against this background, Hippeastrum species exhibit different types of growth habits, including rupiculous species (i.e. species which can grow among rocks) such as H. morelianum, aquatic / semi-aquatic (e.g. H. angustifolium, H. breviflorum and H. harrisonii), and epiphytic (e.g. H. aulicum and H. calyptratum). Hippeastrum is native to basically from Mexico and the Caribbean Islands through Colombia and Venezuela to Argentina, Brasil and Uruguay. However, most species are native / endemic to Bolivia and Peru. I am actually planning for a botanical trip to Bolivia in July/August looking for several species. It would be very nice to share my travel experiences with all of you.

This time, I would like to attach 2 more pictures, including H. solandriflorum (aka H. elegans) and H. traubii forma doraniae. H. solandriflorum is native to Venezuela and northern Brasil which produces two long creamy-white trumpets which is known by local people as “azucena”, a Spanish word for “lily”. My bulbs are raised from seed collected by a friend in Miranda State, Venezuela back in 1996. The species is generally scentless but I have got a couple of bulbs whose flowers have got a very slight scent of vanilla. Hippeastrum traubii forma doraniae hails from an area in Peru which has already been developed for agricultural activities. This form is therefore extinct in the wild. Fortunately, this form produces offsets readily.

So Yu, you are also into Amaryllidaceae. I have also got a good collection of species from southern Africa and have seen a lot of them in the natural habitats. Unlike the American species, a lot of African amaryllids seem to require exact conditions to flower. Some of the species from southern Africa have never flowered for me or have flowered once or twice over a period of 20 years! Fact is that in the wild, these bulbs experience all kinds of special treats nature provides, including scorching summer heat, drought and to certain species such as Cyrtanthus ventricosus and Hessea cinnamomum, the presence of fire and smoke is a necessary condition for flowering. My experience with Cyrtanthus ventricosus is that within 20 days after I set fire, a few bulbs would flower!

South Africa undergoes rapid urbanization, habitats in the vicinity of urban centers are under tremendous pressure for development and are likely to be destroyed in a matter of time. In an area on the west coast of South Africa where a housing development project will take place soon, I have rescued a number of mature bulbs, including Boophone haemanthoides, Ammocharis longifolia and Brunsvigia orientalis bulbs by relocating them to a nature reserve nearby. I might have broken the South African law by moving natural vegetations but it is so sad seeing such great beauties being destroyed.

Orchids…. these are possibly the worst thing in the world as once you have got hooked up with them, you can never get away from them but they are so beautiful and diverse in terms of colour, forms and habits. My focus is mainly Stanhopea, Gongora and Coryanthes as they have got pseudo-bulbs and their hanging flowers are really very attractive. I shall upload pictures to the orchid page later.

Luar


Attachments:
Hippeastrum solandriflorum.JPG
Hippeastrum solandriflorum.JPG [ 259.3 KiB | Viewed 4392 times ]
Hippeastrum traubii forma doraniae.JPG
Hippeastrum traubii forma doraniae.JPG [ 137.88 KiB | Viewed 4392 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 9:51 am 
Absolutely GORGEOUS photographs!! And your Hipp. collection is so different from what most of us here in the U.S. have available to us. Very very interesting.


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 11:31 am 
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Hi Luar:

Your Hippeastrum traubii is super!!

As you mentioned, some South Africa bulbs are hard to flower due to all kinds of reasons. That's one reason some specis such as most Brunsvigia are seldom grown by most gardeners, but only limited to some group of special collectors. So species are quite easy such as so Nerine, Crinum, hybrides are popular in tropical/desert garden. For some hard to flower flower, I actually grow them as leaf plants such as Boophanes, who can refuse the beatiful fan leaves of Boophane? There' are many large growing specis are good for this propuse. Dan who show lots of rare stuff here, can tell you more about south africa bulbs.

I am glad to know you saved some native South africa bulbs from being destroyed, you may need get permit before doing this, but I don't see any harm even without authorization. Now, as far as I know, some native people also start doing this, some of these bulbs end in Botanical gardens, other in new public land and some in private properties.


YU


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 12:32 pm 
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Hi Breezy and all:

I am happy that you like the photos. My Hippeastrum collection is made up mainly of species which grow naturally in the wild. Most Hippeastrum bulbs available at garden centers are hybrids which are supposed to be more superior to natural species in terms of flower size, shape and colour and are easy to maintain in cultivation. Yet, Hippeastrum species are now gaining popularity in cultivation and bulbs can be obtained from mail-order nurseries across USA. Some of my bulbs are actually imported from USA.

One more picture, from left to right:
H. reginae (crimson, showing only a single flower, Brasil and Peru);
H. lapacense (dark red form, Bolivia);
H. yungacensis (orange-red with yellowish star, the Yungas Bolivia);
H. evansiae (creamy yellow, Bolivia);
H. vittatum var tweedianum - aka H. ambiguum var tweedianum (feathery pinkish, Peru);
H. neoleopoldii (red and white, Peru).

Enjoy!

Luar


Attachments:
Hippeastrum group.jpg
Hippeastrum group.jpg [ 103.35 KiB | Viewed 7208 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 12:56 pm 
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sino wrote:
..... For some hard to flower flower, I actually grow them as leaf plants such as Boophanes, who can refuse the beatiful fan leaves of Boophane? There' are many large growing specis are good for this propuse. Dan who show lots of rare stuff here, can tell you more about south africa bulbs.....


Hello Yu:

Just a quickie in response to your remarks on Boophone - Boophone is a very attractive plant even when it is not in flower. The fan-shaped leaves sitting on top of a huge bulb makes it a most ornamental subject. I have seen people in Johannesburg using Boophone disticha as a garden plant. It is also ideal for landscaping purpose in places where climate permits. I have been following Dan's discussions and am sure he has got a lot of rare plants.

Boophone disticha has got a widespread distribution. I have seen them growing naturally in Namibia, in most parts of South Africa through to Tanzania. Bulbs seem to be able to adapt to diverse climates and soil types. I attach 2 pictures below, with one picture showing a large specimen growing on a semi-arid region in central Namibia at about 500 m altitude. Another picture was taken somewhere in Iringa Province in central Tanzania last year, in a lush mountain at about 1,200 m. These are exceptionally LARGE bulbs. In South Africa, I have seen various forms in different locations. In particular, a relatively small form was seen growing in shallow soil pockets at the foothills of Swartberg. And a few years ago, a wine-red form was seen flowering near Bloemfontein after a bush fire.

Luar


Attachments:
Boophone disticha - Namibia.jpg
Boophone disticha - Namibia.jpg [ 101.7 KiB | Viewed 7181 times ]
Boophone disticha - Tanzania.jpg
Boophone disticha - Tanzania.jpg [ 192.15 KiB | Viewed 7175 times ]
Boophone habitat in Tanzania 1200 m.JPG
Boophone habitat in Tanzania 1200 m.JPG [ 159.28 KiB | Viewed 7176 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 1:13 pm 
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Beautiful! The Boophones do have a nice form.


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 2:41 pm 
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Hi Luar:

Thanks for sharing these beautiful pics! Boophane are getting popular here!

The Namibia one is extreme lovely, that's one on my wanted list for a long time. Tanzania one is nice too, if I am right, it may has bright red flowers instead regular dull red ones.

Boophane from South africa are extreme variable. The coast form in East Cape have nice pink flower with frilly leaves. The one from West Cape has wider leaves, less undualte than previously. Some from summer rain fall area just as usual, dull red flower.

And B haemanthoides is alway great, wider leaves plus nice colored flowers!

Yu


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 7:40 pm 
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I've not been to this forum in a long time, but I wanted to say that your Hipeastrum sp. are spectacular!!!!! I only have a few Hippi sp. now as some just did not do well for me. You are right though that many of these species can be found in the U.S. from Kevin Preuss, Telos Rare Bulbs, Jim Shields, etc. Most people like the big ostentatious hybrids because they are very cheap and insanely easy to grow.....pot them and forget them and they flower every year!!

Like Yu, I love some of the South African species and have several Boophone, Brunsvigia, Crinum, etc. I also love Ledebouria, Massonia, Drimia, Drimiopsis, etc.

I have a large Rauhia about to bloom....well, maybe a couple weeks so will try to get a pic when it does and post it. I imported Rauhia several years ago from Peru and I just love them. I also have a Veltheimia bracteata about to bloom that I got from Cameron McMaster 4 years ago so will post a pic of that as well......both pretty common, but beautiful and not widely enough grown I think we can all agree on!!

I am importing some really large Brunsvigia grandiflora in the next couple of weeks and others are going in with these with me so I can not wait to see those.

Your pictures are stunning, your travels must be truly amazing and I really look forward to seeing more of your plants and hearing more about their natural habitat in the future :D Dan

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Dan
Gibsonia, PA
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 9:10 pm 
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Those are some great pictures, and I also enjoyed reading about their habitats and your travels. Thanks for posting!

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Kato Z5 NEPA


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 11:44 pm 
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sino wrote:
As you mentioned, some South Africa bulbs are hard to flower due to all kinds of reasons. That's one reason some specis such as most Brunsvigia are seldom grown by most gardeners.... you may need get permit before doing this, but I don't see any harm even without authorization.....

And B haemanthoides is alway great, wider leaves plus nice colored flowers!


Yes, people get bored by bulbs which have never shown sign of flowering. Yet I suppose some South African amaryllids are naturally shy flowering and this is what they are. However, given appropriate stress such as fire, smoke, heat and drought, certain species would respond to flower promptly. Fortunately, most South African amaryllids would flower as long as their contractile (evergreen) root system is not disturbed at any time. I do have a soft spot for the giant amaryllids. The oldest Boophone bulbs I have seen growing in the wild may be anything older than 800 years based on the thick coats they are wearing. They remind me of a thick pile of cattle dropping when the bulbs are without any leaves.

Relocating wild bulbs from one spot to another spot without permission from the South African Nature Conservation Department is certainly an offense to local regulations regardless of the purpose of the act. I know that the South African authority is most stringent about people digging out wild plants even on private lands. About 20 years ago, a Japanese botanist came to South Africa to collect a small piece of succulent plant for examination whether it was an undescribed species. He was caught by an SA Nature Conservation officer and was heavily fined. He could have been put into jail if he was not supported by local botanical institutions. Fortunately, Boophone bulbs are almost fully exposed and can be removed within a relatively short time. However, mature Ammocharis, Brunsvigia and Crinum bulbs are deep-seated in soil. It usually takes a much longer time and effort to remove the bulbs without damaging the basal plate. I understand that the South African Government now permits selling of wild plants displaced from habitats destroyed for public works and Government projects such as road-widening and drainage works. As far as I know it, some of these rescued bulbs have made their way to Europe and USA through a local SA dealer.

Speaking of B. haemanthoides, I have noticed that the species develops a very simple yet extensive root system which runs almost at the soil level. Apparently, this species requires sufficient space for root-run and flowering. “Strange Wonderful Things” has now got a 2 year-old seedling for auction. The web-site has got a couple of pictures of a nice specimen which are worth viewing. I also attach a picture of my bulb which flowered for me last year.


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B haemanthoides.JPG
B haemanthoides.JPG [ 79.28 KiB | Viewed 7095 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 12:33 am 
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Hi Luar:

Thanks for keep wonderful pic coming and the tips of how to trick blooming. I never think of stress factors. I only think fire will give them more mineral (pottasium mainly) salt, wich in turn will trick the blooming. It seems I go to wrong direction. I will try to stress a little bit my Ammocharis, see will turn out , I will undulate water amount this year instead of never dry it ou which is good way to keep Ammocharis leaves from yellowing.

The B haemanthoids flower is really unique, it flower fit its name very well. Boophane no matter which species, has thick and long root. Sigh, not a easy one as pot plant. Glad they are blooming for you, you definitely know the magics.

Yes, one seller do export very large bulbs to US and EU, I hope they get from legal source.

Luckly, I get my B haemanthoids seedlings from a US nursery years ago without terrible price. The seedlings really grow faster comparing with B disticha seedlings I got same time.

Thanks again for knowledge sharing here.

Yu


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:05 am 
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Dan:

Hippeastrum hybrids are very showy, just that I cannot cope with cultivar names and cannot relate these names to the quality of plants. What are the main reasons why Hippeastrum species don’t do well for you? Kevin Preuss and Diana Chapman certainly have great selections of choice items but I have not looked at Jim Shields’ lists yet.

The photos of Ammocharis, Crinum acaule, Drimiopsis dolomiticus, Haemanthus nortieri, etc. you posted earlier in this forum are absolutely stunning! However, I came to know this web-site when I was searching for information of Eriospermum erinum and there was a discussion of this extraordinary species posted by you, probably in the cacti and succulents forum. So how is your Eriospermum erinum doing for you? And how are your Drimiopsis dolomiticus doing? Please update me on the growing of these plants, thanks.

Veltheimia bracteata is a neat plant, so is Rauhia. What species is your Rauhia? I have got R. decora, R. peruviana (syn R. multiflora) and R. staminosa but they have never flowered for me. What conditions do these bulbs need for flowering? According to a friend who has seen R. staminosa in the natural habitats in northern Peru, mature bulbs of the size of a (English) football were found sitting on loose soil in thickets. I grow my bulbs in shaded area but don’t give too much watering to minimize an y risk of bulb rot. Please post some pictures of your Veltheimia and Rauhia when they are in flower.

So you are expecting some very large Brunsvigia grandiflora bulbs from South Africa in a couple of weeks. What other species will you be importing?

Luar


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 12:30 pm 
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I have just dug out an old photo showing a Boophone disticha flowering in a coastal area near Port Elizabeth, South Africa.


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Boophone disticha flowering in a coastal area near Port Elizabeth.jpg
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 1:16 pm 
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More wonderful pics.....as Yu says, keep them coming!!!

I have made no attempt to get my Eriospermum growing......no room and I want to give them a dormancy before they grow the first time. The Drimiopsis is doing fine.......I was offered more bulbs, but the price is too high for more than one in the collection of this rarity.

I'm not really sure why some of my species Hippis did poorly.......likely because when I got them 8 years ago I did not have enough experience to handle them.......I might try again in the future!!

I got my Veltheimia 4 years ago from Cameron McMaster......a lovely plant without flowers.......I love the Boophane and Brunsvigia for the leaves in general......I consider the bulbs of Boophone to be architectural in nature......just love the bulbs and frilly leaves.

I grow my Rauhia (I have maybe 30 or so of them...most without an ID to be honest) in very fast draining mix in morning sun......they get watered only when they are very dry and the bulbs are potted on the surface. An odd thing about some of these.....I imported quite a few un-IDed bulbs of Rauhia from Peru 2 years ago and they never grew leaves......last summer they produced roots, but never leaves.....I left them in the basement for the winter and decided to see if they would finally grow leaves this spring......I'm happy to say that after 2 years of dormancy they are all leafing out......looking forward to blooms in a few years.

I am also getting several new forms of Veltheimia bracteata as soon as we get warm.....I only have the standard sp. and one called 'Rosalba'......I will get many new form if all goes well as well as hopefully the hybrid between bracteata and capensis......oh, and the wonderful white-flowered form of Scadoxus puniceus.

In addition to the Brunsvigia I will import a few new Boophone disticha and a couple of Crinum I already have so I can produce some seed. Later this year I hope to get many more sp. Crinum (the ones I have coming are acaule, delagoense, minimum and foetidum) to add to the collection. For better or worse in RSA there is a lot of development; fortunately the govt gives permits to several well-known nurseries so that the bulbs can be collected and therefore protected from being destroyed.

I hope some day I can travel to see many of these plants in nature as you have Luar :D Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 9:03 pm 
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sino wrote:
...I never think of stress factors. I only think fire will give them more mineral (pottasium mainly) salt, wich in turn will trick the blooming. It seems I go to wrong direction. I will try to stress a little bit my Ammocharis, see will turn out , I will undulate water amount this year instead of never dry it ou which is good way to keep Ammocharis leaves from yellowing...


Hello Yu and all,

Please try withhold watering your Ammocharis during winter time and force bulbs to complete dormant perhaps this would encourage flowering. Decidious bulbous plants have to experience a dormant period during which the nutrient stored inside the bulb would divert to production of flowers. If these bulbs are watered at time of dormancy, they tend to develop leaves and not flower. Certainly species which are sensitive to watering during dormancy are prone to bulb rot. Fortunately, Ammocharis does not seem to mind a few drops of water at time when they have died back. However, complete withhold of watering is preferred for Ammocharis. Fire should be applied selectively to certain species which respond to this factor and within a suitable time period to trigger flowering* - and it should be applied with caution to avoid burning your house down or turning your beloved bulbs into grilled onions.

(* so far I have only observed the time of setting fire for triggering flowering of Cyrtanthus ventricosus and found that fire is best applied between 3 weeks and 1 month before the flowering time of the species. I am aware that for some species, fire should be applied about 9 months in advance of flowering).

Based on my observations, Ammocharis habitats are free of bush fire. Therefore, I believe that the fire factor is not applicable to flowering of the species but certainly, the natural habitats often experience scorching summer heat (to about 45 deg C) and prolonged drought followed by great floods, perhaps these are the appropriate stress factors which you may consider applying to your Ammocharis. Please keep us updated of your Ammocharis. I look forward to hearing some good news of flowering of your bulbs.

On the other hand, Boophane disticha appears to be much more drought tolerant than Ammocharis coranica. The large bulbs of Boophane are sometimes burned by raging bush fire. As such, I believe that Boophane responds to fire though I have never burned my Boophane.

Luar


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 9:13 pm 
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.... and here we are, a picture showing another "azucena" from the north-west of Argentina, Hippeastrum argentinum (syn H. candidum, H. tucumanum or H. immaculatum). It is native to arid regions in Jujuy, Tucuman and Salta provinces in north-western Argentina and is a favourite of mine. H. argentinum is closely allied to H. pardoii which also hails from the same area, H. argentinum is characterized by its slightly overlapped segments and creamy white colour (hence the scientific name "candidum"). I do have bulbs which come in all 4 different names. Save for the H. immaculatum bulbs which appear to be a winter-growing species, other "species" are summer-growing and take a long rest during winter time. Their flowers look almost exactly the same.


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Hippeastrum argentinum 2.jpg
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 9:46 pm 
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Hi Luar:

The near white Hippeastrum argentinum is gorgeous , I really like this one.

For my Ammocharis, I do keep them bone dry during the winter. One of mine in 12" pot, I accidently water it while water other plants, it starts growing in about two weeks! Really fast response to water!

Your suggestion no or sparely water while dormant is very right. I will keep mine dry at winter. I had bad experince with my boophane grow ing too early even after one water. It is funny, just one water, trigger the growth, this happens to more than one of my boophane.

I remeber Dan have good luck getting his ammocharis seedling flower in later summer, as, the ammocharis experienced a dry hot summer whil he is away on vacation. I guess, The very hot tepmperature bulbs experienced while dormantion, either by weather or by plus right timing water will trigger flower.

Thanks for further tips, really helpful, I appreciate!

Yu


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 10:51 pm 
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Another stunning Hippeastrum Luar :shock:

I agree that Ammocharis should be kept absolutely bone dry during their dormancy. During the summer they can take huge amonts of water and I mean huge amounts. I pot my Ammocharis in a mix of pumice (or volcanic cinder) and a really good potting mix that does not have peat (60:40) and then water every day. With the massive number of roots they can take that water easily. I fertilize often during the summer. By doing this I got a small bulb to bloom in 3 years that started around 1.5 inches in diameter. I hope that my Ammocharis tinneanea will bloom in the next couple of years. I got it bare root last fall so I kept it growing through this winter and will keep it growing next summer before allowing it to go dormant....at that point it should have some really nicely developed roots to bloom in 2010 if all goes well.

I pot my Boophone in pumice or cinder and no soil and then they can take a lot of rain in the summer in my experience. I would love to have my large B. haemanthoides bloom just one time.....after that I would be happy with the leaves alone!!

I forgot that I also had a nice Gethyllis coming....just got my Gethyllis afra today from RSA. I also got some amazing Tylecodon calcaliodes that I hope to post pics of on the succuldent forum in the next week or two when I get a chance.

Keep the amazing pics coming Luar :D Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 10:50 am 
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Luar,

I am in total awe of you species Hippeastrum collection! What a wonderful treat for the eyes and the soul to be able to see these spectacular plants and so beautifully photographed!

I have one species, H. papilo (?), grows like a weed, pups like crazy and seldom blooms for me even though I allow it to grown and rest on it's own schedule - the complete opposite of what my hybrids do. The hybrids are what I grow, but after seeing and reading about the specie you are growing I may have to visit with Jim Shields and see what he has available. I happen to live not too far away from him! (He also grows another plant love/addiction of mine, Hemerocallis)!

I recently was able to add several of the H. cybister hybrids to my collection; 'Ruby Meyer', 'Chico' and 'Emerald'. 'Chico' seems to look most like the species.

H. argentinum is beautiful! I love the extended trumpet form and the pale yellow color! H. traubii forma doraniae is breathtaking! Who'd have thought this was a species?! H. neopardinum - what a lovely this one is and now I know where a lot of the striping comes from in some of my hybrids. Then there's H. breviflorum; this one may interest me the most since I tend to be a bit heavy handed with the watering can! The name indicates that the blooms may not be long lived ("brev = brief"), is this so, or did the name come from something else?

Can you recommend a few specie that would be fairly easy to grow and maintain by the average indoor gardener? I grow my hippies under lights in the winter months (when the bulbs aren't resting or dormant) and then move them outside once the weather warms up. I've even made one cross and grown them to bloom. While my collection is the hybrids I do greatly appreciate and enjoy the variety presented by the species. I like the purity of the species form as well. I have a few species Hemerocallis and the form is perfect as far as I am concerned, and may be why I like the "spider form" of the modern hybrids so much and why that is what I bred for.

Please continue to enchant us with images of the species as well as educate us about this wonderful group of plants!


Rebecca

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:01 pm 
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Hi Rebecca, By far the 2 easiest species to grow are H. striatum and H. puniceum. These are also very cheap and easy to obtain so that is where I would start. By the way, either of these will easily bloom in a 4" square container. Striatum in particular offsets like crazy.....I gave away around 200 offsets last year so got rid of all my extras.

You can get seed for some of the more common species from Mauro Peixoto in Brasil so that is also an easy place to start. I have gotten seed from him and they germinate perfectly so no problems there. None of the species shown above by the way as these are rarer and more expensive as you will likely find out!

Personally, my favorite "Amaryllis" is Worsleya, the famed Blue Amaryllis (I'm hoping I can get more seed of this beauty later in the year)......I hope one day to see my larger ones bloom :D Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 4:15 pm 
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PA-Plantguy wrote:
Hi Rebecca, By far the 2 easiest species to grow are H. striatum and H. puniceum. These are also very cheap and easy to obtain so that is where I would start. By the way, either of these will easily bloom in a 4" square container. Striatum in particular offsets like crazy.....I gave away around 200 offsets last year so got rid of all my extras.

You can get seed for some of the more common species from Mauro Peixoto in Brasil so that is also an easy place to start. I have gotten seed from him and they germinate perfectly so no problems there. None of the species shown above by the way as these are rarer and more expensive as you will likely find out!

Personally, my favorite "Amaryllis" is Worsleya, the famed Blue Amaryllis (I'm hoping I can get more seed of this beauty later in the year)......I hope one day to see my larger ones bloom :D Dan



Dan,

Thank you for your reply, first off. Secondly I wanted to mention the Worselya reyneri, who I did look up and I gotta say, Wow! Here's a link for others to see it:

http://www.bulbsociety.org/GALLERY_OF_THE_WORLDS_BULBS/GRAPHICS/Worsleya/Worsleya_rayneri3/Worsleya_rayneri3.html

Just beyond words!

Now then back to your recommendations; I believe I may have accidentally grown H. striatum about 40 years ago and as I recall it was quite the increaser. My original encounter with this was at a friends orchid range (they were in the florist business and cut flower trade before then), Anyway, they had several very over grown pots of these lovely dwarf Amaryills. Of course at the time all I know was that they were an unknown variety. Well I decided on one of my visits I would re-pot these Amaryllis and lined out all the pups in a bench bed and potted the larger bulbs in 4 inch orchid pots. A couple of months later I returned to find that the larger bulbs had bloomed and that is when I really fell in love with this amaryllis. Such a pretty shade of clear orange and then a green and yellow throat - the contrast was amazing! Severl months after that on another return visit a lot of the "pups" were blooming. Now that was a sight! In the meantime I had brought one home, but for the life of me I can not remember what ever happen with that bulb or if it ever bloomed for me. I do know I would like to get one again and I have a few friends who would also be interested, so when yours has/have gone pup crazy again, please remember me!

I also looked up H. puniceum and if yours is var. barbatum, then this would also be one I would be interested in obtaining. One of my friends makes a lot of crosses with the plants she has, mostly hybrids mind you, but she has a few primary hybirds she is working with. One is xJohnsonii and crossing it with other interesting forms/colors, ect, in hopes of developing hardier strains for use as landscaping plants (in the south). The difficult part is in being able to find out what the polidy of the parents is. She has done many test crosses in her attempt to plot out the polidy of the plants she grows.

Is the polidy of the species listed anywhere? If so, WHERE!?!

Rebecca

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Lebanon, IN USDA Zone 5
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 8:52 pm 
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sino wrote:
For my Ammocharis, I do keep them bone dry during the winter. One of mine in 12" pot, I accidently water it while water other plants, it starts growing in about two weeks! Really fast response to water....


Hi Yu and all,

My experience with Ammocharis coranica suggests that as long as you leave the large bulb undisturbed over the years and that you do not over-water them, it will flower. Besides, Ammocharis does not always flower every year even in the wild so don't think that you do not give the bulbs proper care if your bulb does not flower on regular basis. By the way, do you cultivate your bulb deep in a container? In the wild, bulbs are deep-seated. Some friends of mine put the large bulbs on top of the growing medium which does not look quite right yet Ammocharis coranica does not seem to mind exposing the large bulbs to above soil level.

Ammocharis coranica is a sun-loving species. Give it as much sunlight as possible as this might encourage flowering. Please also check the underside of the leaves as the species tends to attract red-spider mite which is an efficient virus-spreading agent.

Ammocharis coranica is widely distributed from the Little Karoon in southern South Africa to tropical grassland in east Africa. As such, it is a highly variable species. I know that there is a dark red form which is native to around along the Fish River in Eastern Cape. This form has got narrow segments and gives a rather "spidery" look. I have also seen a "bi-color" form which has got different shades of pink and the flower-head is exceptionally dense and large. There is still a "small" form whose flower head is considerably smaller in size than the "bi-colour" form.

Luar


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 8:59 pm 
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It is now Hippeastrum season here in Hong Kong! A number of bulbs are now flowering and I expect that more bulbs will be budding soon.

This time, I attach an image of Hippeastrum aulicum which is an eye-catching species native to the Atlantic Forest in south-eastern Brasil. Hippeastrum aulicum is one of the very few species which can be found growing on tree trunks like an epiphyte. In the wild, a narrow-petalled flower form also exists. In cultivation, bulbs grow well in media of orchid mix and compost.


Attachments:
Hippeastrum aulicum.jpg
Hippeastrum aulicum.jpg [ 62.24 KiB | Viewed 6916 times ]


Last edited by Luar on Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 9:27 pm 
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PA-Plantguy wrote:
I agree that Ammocharis should be kept absolutely bone dry during their dormancy. During the summer they can take huge amonts of water and I mean huge amounts. I pot my Ammocharis in a mix of pumice (or volcanic cinder) and a really good potting mix that does not have peat (60:40) and then water every day. With the massive number of roots they can take that water easily. I fertilize often during the summer. By doing this I got a small bulb to bloom in 3 years that started around 1.5 inches in diameter. I hope that my Ammocharis tinneanea will bloom in the next couple of years....

I pot my Boophone in pumice or cinder and no soil and then they can take a lot of rain in the summer in my experience. I would love to have my large B. haemanthoides bloom just one time.....after that I would be happy with the leaves alone!!

I forgot that I also had a nice Gethyllis coming....just got my Gethyllis afra today from RSA..


Hello Dan:

You certainly have broken the world record flowering an Ammocharis bulb in 3 years. From what you have described, Ammocharis coranica benefits greatly from being fed. I do not feed my bulbs but shall do so after reading your post. Any photos of your bulbs in flower?

I imported my Ammocharis tinneana from Exotica Botanical Rarities 7 years ago. Ernst Specks said that the bulb was [wild collected] from Kenya. It is of the size of a grape-fruit. I suspect that the bulb is not flowering size. How big is yours?

BTW, the name of genus "Ammocharis" is made up of 2 latin words the first part "ammo" refers to "sand" and "charis" stands for "beauty".

Boophone is certainly a most ornamental bulb species I have ever seen and is often cultivated like a succulent plant. It definitely deserves a prominent place in the backyard. I grow my B. haemanthoides in a large container to provide room for the extensive root system. The photo I attached above shows an early flowering stage which I think is the most attractive stage of flowering. Once the flowers are fully open, they look more like a Brunsvigia than a Haemanthus.

Gethyllis is actually a favourite genus of mine because of its interesting growth cycle and all parts of the plant are so attractive! The miniature club-shaped fruits emit a strong aroma are used for making very strong liquour called "Koekoemakranka brandy" (you have to pronounce the "k" sound from the throat STRONGLY) by Dutch farmers in South Africa. As the brandy contains a very high alocoholic content, the South African Government now gives permission to making of the brandy to licenced farmers. A few years ago, I paid a visit to a local agricultural museum in the Wesern Cape where I bought 2 bottles of diluted Koeloemakranka brandy. Just one seep and the aroma stays in your throat the whole day.

Luar


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:08 pm 
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Rebecca47 wrote:
I have one species, H. papilo (?), grows like a weed, pups like crazy and seldom blooms for me even though I allow it to grown and rest on it's own schedule...I may have to visit with Jim Shields and see what he has available. I happen to live not too far away from him!

I recently was able to add several of the H. cybister hybrids to my collection; 'Ruby Meyer', 'Chico' and 'Emerald'. 'Chico' seems to look most like the species.

H. argentinum is beautiful! I love the extended trumpet form and the pale yellow color! H. traubii forma doraniae is breathtaking! Who'd have thought this was a species?! H. neopardinum - what a lovely this one is and now I know where a lot of the striping comes from in some of my hybrids. Then there's H. breviflorum; this one may interest me the most since I tend to be a bit heavy handed with the watering can! The name indicates that the blooms may not be long lived ("brev = brief"), is this so, or did the name come from something else?

Can you recommend a few specie that would be fairly easy to grow and maintain by the average indoor gardener?.... I have a few species Hemerocallis and the form is perfect as far as I am concerned, and may be why I like the "spider form" of the modern hybrids so much and why that is what I bred for...


Dear Rebecca:

I am happy that you like the pictures. Hippeastrum is definitely an amazing genus. I am thrilled that your papilio grows like weed for you. Without knowing the climate zone you are in, it is difficult to give advice on what species might do well for you. Fortunately, most Hippeastrum species do not have specific cultivation requirements and would grow well given sufficient sunlight, warmth and that you do not overwater them especially during winter time. The only few species which should receive special treatments are the aquatic / semi-aquatic species (H. angustifolium, H. breviflorum and H. harrisonii) and the epiphytic species (H. aulicum and H. calyptratum) which should be cultivated in high-organic media. H. calyptratum should be kept in a semi-shaded area with high humidity. On the other hand, species from northern Argentina (e.g. H. parodii and H. argentinum) should be kept on the dry side most of the year. These species may go through a dormant period of up to 4 months! Although most Hippeastrum species are native to the Andes of Bolivia, Peru and Argentina, bulbs grow equally well in this sub-tropical climate. In colder climates, however, Hippeastrum bulbs are prone to fungal infection which may result in bulb rot. Therefore, if you are living in an area colder than USDA zone 8, I suggest you provide heating for your bulbs and withhold watering during winter time.

"Ruby Meyer" is a great beauty. I have seen images of "Royal Velvet" which is a beautiful dark red Hippeastrum.

Apart from Jim Shields, I suggest you visit Telos' web-site. Diana Chapman has also got a good collection of Hippeastrum species. Most Hippeastrum species are self-sterile and do not make seed on a single clone. Others, such as H. petiolatum, H. evansiae and H. anzaldoi, do not make seed even though you cross-pollinate different clones, the only way to get plant is wait until mature bulbs have produced side bulbs. I give away offsets from time to time but don't know if there is any problem you import bulbs without any papers. Let me know and I shall see what I have got for you.

H. breviflorum is small in size compared to most other species and hence the name. It is an aquatic species which grows along rivers and streams in NE Argentina, southern Brasil and southern Paraguay. It is a self-compatible species which makes seed. H. breviflorum is closely allied to H. harrisonii which is endemic to swampy areas in northern Uruguay.

Hemerocallis or Hymenocallis? I have got several Hymenocallis species, they make great indoor plants. I have got a large Hymenocallis tubiflora whose shiny waxy leaves always makes a great conversation piece.

Luar


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 Post subject: Re: Hippeastrum
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:12 pm 
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Hi Luar:

Thanks for more Ammocharis growing tips.
I do believe fertilizer help bulbs growth. You can tell the difference by just one growing reason.

I am used to watering Ammocharis as much as possible during the active growing season. I think this is a little bit over "killed". Ammocharis is keeping growing leaves if well watered, which consuming too much energy.


Yu


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