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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:11 pm 
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Location: Deep south
Last year I planted two pots of habanero peppers, and was quite amazed at the yield I got from them. There are only so many pots of chili or gumbo or pones of Mexican cornbread you can chop two of these little firebombs up in, so I decided I needed to come up with another way of enjoying them. This is what I arrived at:


A delicious dip for chips, chicken wings...you name it. The honey hides the fire until the last bite is taken, and then the burn begins.

16 whole habanero peppers, stemmed
1 (8 ounce) can tomato paste
1 onion, minced
3 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon virgin olive oil
1/2 cup distilled vinegar
1/4 cup lemon juice
7 tablespoons honey
8 dashes worcestershire sauce

Sautee onion in olive oil, stirring in garlic powder until soft. Add a small amount of water and continue cooking for about fifteen more minutes over low heat, stirring occasionally. (As a side note, I had a happy accident while looking for all of the blender parts, and scorched this mixture a bit - all to the good. It added a very nice "roasted" taste.) DO NOT cook your habaneros, as this kills the taste. When the onions are sauteed, place in a blender with the rest of the ingredients (you will want to make sure that your habaneros are whole - not peeled or seeded, as much warmth is contained in the seeds), and puree into a smooth mixture. At this point, you will want to return this mixture to heat for about five minutes - not long enough to kill the flavor of the 'neros, but just long enough to blend the different tastes well.
A bit of a warning -- this dip doesn't seem excessively hot at first blush, because the honey really does mask the capsicum from the habaneros. Give it a few seconds before taking the next bite though, and you will find it to be quite warm.
This dip will keep for quite some time in the refrigerator, as I think that mold might actually fear it. I've been nibbling on the last batch for a couple of months now, and it only gets better with age.

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Cayennes are cool - but Habs will burn yo'......


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 2:54 pm 
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Location: PNW
It sounds like that would chase the winter flu bugs right out of you! It sounds good, but my body doesn't handle the hot foods very well. Mildly spiced is too much sometimes.

Have you ever used fresh garlic instead of powdered? That would be tasty.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 3:07 pm 
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Location: Deep south
luv2grdn wrote:
It sounds like that would chase the winter flu bugs right out of you! It sounds good, but my body doesn't handle the hot foods very well. Mildly spiced is too much sometimes.

Have you ever used fresh garlic instead of powdered? That would be tasty.


You know, I'd bet it would at that.

I was in my cardio's office last week, and his nurse and I were chatting about foods not only heart healthy, but particulary those that are heart ACTIVE healthy. Of course the subject of peppers came up, as did garlic. I've eaten a ton of fresh roasted garlic (just lightly oil the outside of a head, wrap it in foil and roast it), but never even thought about using in on whole wheat to make french bread. Turns out it is goooood that way. Just peel the roasted garlic and spread it on the bread and toast it under the broiler. hmmmm...

Peppers, onions, garlic...three things I try to never be without. Of course I don't get asked on many dates, but my wife doesn't mind that, and since we dine togther, she doesn't notice it either. lol

You know, you've given me an idea...perhaps substituting cayennes or jalapenos for habs for those who don't appreciate the heat as much as I do, and perhaps even hot banana peppers...all of which I keep a good supply of in season...

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Cayennes are cool - but Habs will burn yo'......


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 3:14 pm 
Sounds delicious - if a bit fiery. Thanks!!


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 3:29 pm 
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Location: PNW
For another garlic bread idea, put garlic through a press and mix it in fresh olive oil with a little salt and either spread it on toast or put it on bread and broil it. I get french loaves and slice them almost through, then spread the garlic mix on each slice and bake it for a short time. Don't put the mix on heavily or it will be too oil drenched. I used to do this with butter all the time, until I found out my kids had a dairy allergy. They said they'd miss my garlic bread a lot. So I started thinking about a substitute and tried this and we don't miss the butter at all. It's a lot better for us any way!

My doc told me to chop or press the garlic and let it sit for I think 5 minutes or more and this releases the parts that are beneficial to health. Not the best explanation!


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 3:56 pm 
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Location: Deep south
luv2grdn wrote:
... They said they'd miss my garlic bread a lot. So I started thinking about a substitute and tried this and we don't miss the butter at all. It's a lot better for us any way!


Ain't that the way it is? Necessity IS the mother of invention...and that inventions sounds REAL good from here. :)

After the third MI, I've found that there are a world of things you can do to tailor your diet to fit your particular requirements, while actually improving your enjoyment of it as well.

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 Post subject: Yikes
PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:45 pm 
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Location: Sunol, CA (9B)
I remember the first time I had habanjero, my fraternity brother had diced one up and put it on a pizza to give it extra kick - then couldn't eat it. I said I'd eat it and took a bite. It gave me violent hiccups and even hurt to have it in my stomach. A few weeks later I had a similar reaction to a shot of 151 on an empty stomach. Ahh, school days.

Anyway, I digress. Habanjero is an extreme biohazard - be careful out there.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 9:52 pm 
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Location: PNW
Thinwhite wrote:
Ain't that the way it is? Necessity IS the mother of invention...and that inventions sounds REAL good from here. :)

After the third MI, I've found that there are a world of things you can do to tailor your diet to fit your particular requirements, while actually improving your enjoyment of it as well.


It sure is! My daughter once had to eliminate 24 foods from her diet, most of them things we used often, like tomatoes, onions, and garlic. That took a lot of imagination for me to come up with meals without the last 2, since I used them just about every day. Fortunately there are cook books that help with this, so I wasn't going into it totally blind. I also had to do a 2 day rotation, so I'd keep a list of what we had each day to keep it straight. It's a good thing I enjoy cooking and it was nice to have some different things. It gave my kids more variety too.

P Spark, that must've been one powerful pepper you had!


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 Post subject: Re: Yikes
PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 1:26 am 
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Location: Deep south
promethean_spark wrote:
I remember the first time I had habanjero, my fraternity brother had diced one up and put it on a pizza to give it extra kick - then couldn't eat it. I said I'd eat it and took a bite. It gave me violent hiccups and even hurt to have it in my stomach. A few weeks later I had a similar reaction to a shot of 151 on an empty stomach. Ahh, school days.

Anyway, I digress. Habanjero is an extreme biohazard - be careful out there.


lol. Isn't Prometheus the fellow who gave fire to mankind?

Seriously, though, I find habs to be right at the edge of my pleasure/pain threshold. Perhaps the reason I've yet to grow its cousin, the Scotch Bonnet. At around 350K Scoville units, they are about a hundred thousand units hotter than their orange family members.

I plant from seedlings, having no "happy place" apparently in my house (window facing wise) to do well with bedding from seed. The bonnet is easy enough to find around here in seedling form, so I think this year I have to at least TRY one.

As yet the Bhut Jolokia seedlings have not shown up in my area. At a million SU, that's probably in my best interests.

Oh, did I mention that my favorite breakfast is fresh picked cayennes from the pots right outside my back door? :twisted:

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 3:31 am 
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All of it sounds delicious! Now I'm getting hungry.

Quote:
I plant from seedlings, having no "happy place" apparently in my house (window facing wise) to do well with bedding from seed.


If all else fails you could start them under lights. :)

Foxy.


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 Post subject: Re: Yikes
PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 4:20 pm 
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Location: PNW
Thinwhite wrote:
Oh, did I mention that my favorite breakfast is fresh picked cayennes from the pots right outside my back door? :twisted:


You can have my share too! :shock: ;)


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 6:59 pm 
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Location: Deep south
foxykitten350234 wrote:
All of it sounds delicious! Now I'm getting hungry.

Quote:
I plant from seedlings, having no "happy place" apparently in my house (window facing wise) to do well with bedding from seed.


If all else fails you could start them under lights. :)

Foxy.


You know, I have considered that. It just seems too easy to pick them up at the local co-op already seeded and growing. Not that I'm lazy, mind you...I just like to conserve as much energy as possible. (where's the emoticon with the halo? lol) Besides, as I said, the Bhut would be my downfall I fear...and seed for them IS available...

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 7:18 pm 
But. . . . I can tell you from first-hand experience that it IS an AWFUL lot of fun to raise your own plants from seed. Not only does the seed last from year to year (if kept in an air-tight container in a cool/dry/dark place - I use a spare room closet), but the varieties you can choose & grow are far far greater than what you'll find already sprouted at the stores.

I start peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, brassicas, herbs, flowers, & some greens indoors from seed just using regular plain inexpensive fluorescent "shop" lights. Work great, & I doubt the electrical output is any greater than the extra $$ you spend buying started plants from the store.

And like I said - most seed stores very well. Heck, I've grown succesful plants from seed I've had for 10 (yes, I did say 10) years. Well stored, many seeds remain viable for a long long time.


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 Post subject: yeah
PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 8:05 pm 
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I doubt the energy savings of handling and shipping plants from goodness knows where (heated greenhouse?) to your store, then driving out to buy them, is any worse than getting seed in the mail (mailman comes anyway...) and planting them under a relatively efficient light for a couple weeks.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 10:00 pm 
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Fresh Salsa!!!!

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 Post subject: Re: yeah
PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 10:02 pm 
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Location: Deep south
promethean_spark wrote:
I doubt the energy savings of handling and shipping plants from goodness knows where (heated greenhouse?) to your store, then driving out to buy them, is any worse than getting seed in the mail (mailman comes anyway...) and planting them under a relatively efficient light for a couple weeks.


Lol, sparky. I was referring to MY energy! :D

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2007 12:28 am 
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Quote:
You know, I have considered that. It just seems too easy to pick them up at the local co-op already seeded and growing. Not that I'm lazy, mind you...I just like to conserve as much energy as possible. (where's the emoticon with the halo? lol) Besides, as I said, the Bhut would be my downfall I fear...and seed for them IS available...


I was thinking you could go this route for plants that might not be available as seedlings :)

Foxy.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 10:26 pm 
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Location: Deep south
foxykitten350234 wrote:
I was thinking you could go this route for plants that might not be available as seedlings :)

Foxy.


You know, I actually DO this for a lot of plants. And as far as peppers, they seem to have a very good sprout to seed ratio....it just seems that to date, most of the plants that I have tried using the from seed method have just been too spindly to get a good start in life for some reason.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2007 2:52 am 
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Location: PNW
I have to use lights to start my peppers and tomatoes, otherwise they'd get too spindly from the lack of light. We have a lot of overcast, dark days. Tomatoes aren't such a big problem if they get spindly, since you can bury a lot of the stem any way.


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 Post subject: Still might be good
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2007 4:15 pm 
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A pair of fluorescent bulbs on 16 hours a day will only consume about 38kwh/month, which costs $5-10 - but is enough light to start two trays of seedlings, ~100 plants.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 11:51 am 
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Thinwhite wrote:
luv2grdn wrote:
It sounds like that would chase the winter flu bugs right out of you! It sounds good, but my body doesn't handle the hot foods very well. Mildly spiced is too much sometimes.

Have you ever used fresh garlic instead of powdered? That would be tasty.


You know, I'd bet it would at that.

I was in my cardio's office last week, and his nurse and I were chatting about foods not only heart healthy, but particulary those that are heart ACTIVE healthy. Of course the subject of peppers came up, as did garlic. I've eaten a ton of fresh roasted garlic (just lightly oil the outside of a head, wrap it in foil and roast it), but never even thought about using in on whole wheat to make french bread. Turns out it is goooood that way. Just peel the roasted garlic and spread it on the bread and toast it under the broiler. hmmmm...

Peppers, onions, garlic...three things I try to never be without. Of course I don't get asked on many dates, but my wife doesn't mind that, and since we dine togther, she doesn't notice it either. lol

You know, you've given me an idea...perhaps substituting cayennes or jalapenos for habs for those who don't appreciate the heat as much as I do, and perhaps even hot banana peppers...all of which I keep a good supply of in season...


We are never without our supply either of all. I roast and have eaten ton of garlic. We eat lots of hot peppers, and onions. We eat lots of onions too.

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