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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 3:16 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2006 12:09 pm
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This is my Amorphophallus corrugatus that just opened today and stunk maybe worse than any other I own....for the most part I do not think they smell to be honest!!
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With the warty spadix I think this is one of the top 2 favorite Amorphs I have ever bloomed....poor fella needs some cream :D Dan

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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 10:26 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 2:28 pm
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Location: Germany - Bergstrasse
wow dan,
it really looks nice! can't imagin it smelling bad --at least it's a pretty stinker :P

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:10 pm 
Amorphophallus produce a unsexual inflorescence. All unsexual (divided swimming) aroids produce an inflorescences in which the spathe consists of two sections, both normally wrapped around the spadix with a constriction separating the two sections. That constriction is not apparent in these photos.

The upper portion of the spathe is called the limb or blade while the lower is a normally convolute tube or chamber. On the spadix the imperfect male and female flowers occur in separate regions or zones as can be seen in your photos. An imperfect flower is one that contains only a single swimming.

Normally the zone of female flowers occurs at the very bottom of the spadix within the lowest portion of the spathe known as the spathe tube or floral chamber. The floral chamber is not clearly defined in this specimen since it is normally closed and covers the female flowers.

Above this female zone where there is normally a constriction is a zone of sterile male flowers. These sterile flowers produce a pheromone (odor) which attracts insect pollinators in exactly the same fashion as bisexual species. Bisexual species are ones such as an Anthurium which produce perfect flowers containing both male and female sexual organs. Anthurium are sometimes capable of self pollination since both sexes are found together.

The female flowers of a unisexual inflorescence are receptive for only a single day and then the male flowers produce pollen a day or two after the female flowers are sexually receptive. This prevents self pollination and requires pollen to be brought from another plant also at sexual anthesis.

Normally, above these sterile flowers and within the upper spathe blade or limb occurs the zone of fertile male flowers. Those fertile male flowers produce the pollen. All these zones can be clearly seen in the photos. Philodendron species are also unisexual but the female floral chamber is always clearly closed.

Pollen appears to be visible on the upper male section.


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