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 Post subject: Toxic foods
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 3:19 pm 
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I had a lab, that I had to put down in his 16th year. He was a chocoholic. I had no idea chocolate was toxic to dogs, (and I guess he missed that memo too). I suppose from reading that most of what we shared was milk chocolate and that it is less problematic.
Now I've heard about grapes/raisins:
http://ezinearticles.com/?Grapes,-Nuts,-and-Your-Dogs-Health----Foods-that-Fido-should-Avoid&id=20315
and...onions:
http://www.jlhweb.net/Boxermap/onions.html
The news about onions, I heard from an animal piece on one of the morning news shows.
The handler said, "..and of course as we all know onions are toxic to dogs". (We all?)
I have had dogs since I was a kid..(back when they were invented), and never heard this.
Growing up I thought dogs were the first part of doing the dishes.
So...before I kill off pets (which has never happened) does anyone have some other foods that should not be fed to cats or dogs?

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 6:38 pm 
Don't feel bad RedHen. We had a Doberman who lived to the ripe old age of 14 & her favorite snack was chocolate-covered ice cream bon-bons, which we frequently indulged her with. Who knew?

But frankly, this dog lived a long healthy happe life, & I refuse to feel guilty about having indulged her. Granted, if I had known then what I know now, obviously I wouldn't have given them to her, but really - 14 is a good age for a Doberman.

Onions are problematic for nearly all pets - ferrets, birds, cats, dogs, etc. As far as grapes & raisins, I continue to hear differing views re: the extent of the toxicity, but luckily none of my guys are interested in them except for my cockatoo. And we definitely limit them to her because the high sugar in them can, believe it or not, trigger diabetes in birds. Again - who knew?


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 8:47 pm 
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yes, chocolate can be bad, even down-right dangerous, for dogs.

milk chocolate isn't be as problematic and the bigger the dog, the less likely a negative reaction will be seen. also, the amount digested will also affect how severe a reaction is - if it occurs at all.

it's the theobromine in the chocolate that is the problem and the darker the chocolate, the more of that there is. that's why milk chocolate doesn't usually cause anything more than some diarrhea. pure cocoa or a good bar of dark chocolate, now, that would be a different story!

onions and garlic are also seem to be bad. same for grapes and raisons (raisons ARE grapes - only more concentrated) - the grape issue has been documented recently.

ferrets should never, ever have any type of fruit or vegetable as they can't digest it (no cecum) and the sugars in the fruit m will also cause issues as will the resulting sugar from grains. ferrets are liable to have issues with low blood sugar as opposed to high (which is diabetes).

cats i've never heard too much that is bad for them foodwise. and the other cat that i had used to wait patiently by the oven when i was cooking the thanksgiving turkey...not only did she love turkey, she loved my stuffing even more!! that has some onion in it and she never seemed to have a problem with it - she lived to be 17.

basically, shouldn't really give your animals your food. if you want them to have real meat, cook it seperately and don't put any spices, herbs or even salt/pepper on it.

anything in moderation will rarely cause any serious or unreversable problems.

i have, and will continue to give my animals bits/pieces of some of my food. i won't ever willingly give chocolate to a dog though (no matter what the size of the dog).

i'm surprised grapes would be an issue for birds! they're fruit and seed eaters so that one is really suprising!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 3:28 am 
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Our dog gets carrots as her reward and she gets bits of salad makings when I'm putting one together too. Hopefully I won't read some day that anything I give her is bad. I've never given her anything with chocolate. She likes berries too. Our former dogs would pick blackberries on our walks and seemed to know which ones were perfectly ripe.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 10:44 am 
I was surprised about the grapes/bird thing too. They're not "forbidden" (like avocados are), but are definitely supposed to be limited because of the high sugar content. Apparently some studies were done on diabetes in pet birds, & grapes came up as a serious culprit. Citrus is also supposed to be limited because of its acidity (which is a shame, because our bird LOVES oranges).

All in all, it's probably not terribly surprising since Cockatoos in the wild probably 1) instinctively know what to choose, & 2) have more variety to choose from.

I just make a valiant attempt to make the fresh portion of my bird's diet as varied as possible - especially when more "exotic" fruits are on sale (mango, papaya, pomegranite), etc. And of course, I also give her lots of greens & veggies - especially during the gardening months. Beets & beet tops, carrots & carrot tops, wild greens like dandelion & red clover, etc., etc. I try to stick to the moderation & variety in all things mantra - lol!

(She does also get a daily mixed pellet diet (Roudybush & Zoopreem), along with some mixed seed.)


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 2:15 pm 
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I always wonder if birds develop problems from not having the foods that they've had in their native habitat habit for many,many years. But then seagulls eat a lot of junk and are still going strong. Who knows!

Dogs and cats are getting human diseases at a rapid rate and I'd bet it's diet related.

Breezy it sounds like you spoil your cockatoo very well! :)


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 2:45 pm 
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all animals that we keep as pets aren't as healthy as they could be these days!! they were much better off before these commercial kibbles became the norm as people would tend to provide foods that were more closely related to what they'd eat out in the wild and, they were usually 'working' animals and would do some hunting and that would supplement what the owners provided.

due to its nature, commercial kibbles contain high amounts of grains to bind the stuff together. even those that don't have grains (those touted as 'natural') still have something in them as a binding agent (usually potato). because of the way the stuff is made, it's very hard to NOT have the binders in them.

i've had cats for a long time. since i've had ferrets i've learned a lot about nutrition of animals. ferrets are a bit different than cats/dogs - they're strictly carnivores and can't digest vegy's or fruits (cats and dogs can) so their dietary needs are a bit different. the kibbles availabe, even those specifically made for ferrets really leave a lot to be desired. i've learned much and have applied what i've learned to feeding the cat as well as the ferrets.

as much as i'd love to, i can't have birds as i'm extremely allergic. i do know that they have very specific needs.

regardless of what type of animal you have, it's always best to give them foods that mimic what nature intended as much as possible.

yes, kibbles are SO much more convenient and sometimes less expensive. the downside is that you may end up with more vet bills due to imbalances in nutrition. and there's the cancer issues - it's much more prevalent for us what with all the overly processed foods we eat. it certainly makes sense that our animals will also have an increase in occurances of them too, since they're eating overly processed foods too! not to mention things like that big recall last year.

oh, btw, there's another recall that was just announced the other day! same brands/products as before - rice gluten this time instead of the wheat as before. looks to be the same company that manufactures all those different brands is still getting product from that same company in china as almost all the same brand names are on the list of recalled items!

sheesh! and that chinese company as well as the importer here in the us were just indicted last week for the fiasco last year!

i haven't quite gotten the ferrets on raw food yet. working on it. not sure if i'm going to do that with the cat or not. in the mean time, i feed them cooked meat and evo kibble - it's mostly meat and doesn't have corn or wheat or rice in it. it does use potato as the binder.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 4:54 pm 
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Joclyn, my thoughts exactly! Kibble is convenient, but deadly in a lot of cases.
A friend of mine has 3 cats with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism is common with dogs, so they're missing something major.
Raw food has so many factors that are killed with processing, things that are needed to properly digest the food, so it's no wonder they have the same problems as us humans. Then the way we feed the animals that are to be our food gives us more health problems, like grain fed beef, which put on more fat unnaturally, causing problems with our circulatory system and creating inflammation. Etc, etc., etc. In other words, their systems weren't designed for grain. It's just too bad the grass fed beef is so expensive, like any "health" food. It's like paying a higher price for certain brand names of clothing. I'd think letting a cow graze and not giving growth hormones and antibiotics or supplementing with grain would be cheaper. Ok, I'll get off my soapbox!! :roll:
The news the other night showed a slaughter house where the cows were severely abused and very sick ones were being sent to the slaughter house. Pretty scary to think my kid could be eating that beef in school.
Birds probably get fed the best, with the way Breezy is doing it. It's much easier to give them a diet that mimics what they'd have in the wilds.
I'll quit now. :D


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:33 am 
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RedHen, I'm so sorry for the loss of your baby. It sounds like he had a long healthy life even though he was a chocoholic.

Off the top of my head those are the only people food that I can think of that are toxic or extremly harmful to dogs. I'm surprised all vets don't make this more common knowledge. When I got my most recent kitten I was given a book on taking care of him. Even though I have had cats for the past 15+ years I still read every word of it. You never know what new tid-bit may have come up since the last kittens. Sure enough I learned you should never ever wash kitty with human's shampoo. All we can do is live and learn and pass it along to everyone we can.

Quote:
oh, btw, there's another recall that was just announced the other day! same brands/products as before - rice gluten this time instead of the wheat as before. looks to be the same company that manufactures all those different brands is still getting product from that same company in china as almost all the same brand names are on the list of recalled items!


Thank you for the warning!

joclyn, since it is the wee hours of the morning I'm not sure if I'm reading your post correct. I'm getting the feeling you are trying to get your pets away from kibble. Just in case you didn't know manufactured cat food is supplimented with taurene (warning, my spelling may be off:). Meat naturally contains this stuff, but the cooking process kills it off. If you take your cat off of the commercial foods be sure to suppliment or feed raw meat. Cats will die without it. One other warning, feeding raw meat to pets can open you up to food poisoning. This is why vets generaly don't recomend raw diets...lawsuits and all those modern pit falls, you know? :roll:

Foxy.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 12:38 pm 
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luv2grdn wrote:
Birds probably get fed the best, with the way Breezy is doing it. It's much easier to give them a diet that mimics what they'd have in the wilds.


I suspect that most birds aren't as lucky and only get occasional fruit as a treat, as for being able to mimic a bird's wild diet more easily, i'm not sure that's necessarily true. Birds will eat an awful lot of things that we can't or dislike and so don't cultivate, the assumption that they're fruit eaters and so should happily consume all the fruit we can throw at them, regardless of its natural distribution, could be a dangerous one. It's also worth remembering that natural fruit producing species are rarely eaten by humans, everything we grow has been cultivated in some way and, when it comes to fruit, often bred to increase sugar content and make for sweeter fruits.

So, cats need taurine, right, i have the solution. Take your animals off their dry biscuit feed and replace it with cornflakes and red bull!

Grain fed beef may be less healthy than grass fed but grain does at least have surprisingly low levels of bonemeal...
I'm more concerned about feedstuffs from a welfare point of view, after all, red meat will kill you anyway, or so i'm told.

The most important thing is to simply not feed your pets crap which you know isn't even particularly good for you, it's a fairly safe bet that they're even less well equipped to deal with it than you are.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:37 pm 
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Ok Phil, maybe I should rephrase that. :) What I was thinking was that birds are fed the foods in their natural state, whole seeds, fruits and vegies, which is better than the kibble which is comprised of things that are cooked and processed, therefore destroying enzymes and such. The birds aren't necessarily getting their native diet, but it is better than what dogs and cats get. But if birds don't eat what they're given, then that causes them problems. Our bird would go through her seed mix and pick out all the safflower seeds and not eat much of the rest.

Good point about the hybridized fruits. There are some who believe they're not good for humans either. Time will tell...

Grass fed beef has higher levels of Omega 3 fatty acids, which protect your circulatory system from the problems grain fed beef causes. Media has touted red meat as being bad for so long that it's hard to believe it can actually be good for you if the animal is raised properly. But there is still a lot unknown, so there may be different things said about it sometime in the future.

Foxy, I'd think raw meat would be safer to handle if it is seared first, just heating the outer parts where the bacteria live, but maybe there's more to it than that. I've always heard that ground meat is riskier to eat rare because of the fact that grinding it mixes the bacteria throughout it.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 2:06 pm 
I must chime in & confirm that my bird's basic diet is pellet-based. I use a mix of both Roudybush & Zoopreem, both of which have successfully been used by both exotic bird breeders & zoos worldwide. The nutritional research behind these two brands is exceptional, & they both came highly recommended by my bird's specialty avian vet (who doesn't make any $$ off of his recommendations).

As far as my cats & dogs - both also get kibble, along with some canned food. The cats get a mix of different premium varieties, & the dogs get NutroMax. Again - my vet fully approves of the diets I feed, & doesn't supply them to me.

Frankly, I think you can "overthink" all this pet dietary stuff (& I don't mean last year's pet food debacle). All my animals have lived to ripe old ages - well into their very late teens. Even my extremely large dogs. I'm happy, my vets are happy, my animals are happy. :D

(P.S. The raw diet thing is EXTREMELY controversial these days. Actually - for both animals & PEOPLE. I've yet to come across a veterinary (or human medical) professional I respect who'd recommend it, & it has nothing to do with lawsuits.)


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 3:12 pm 
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susan, i'm so sorry!! :oops: i neglected to offer condolences on the loss of your puppy!! {{{susan}}} (and thanks, foxy for reminding me!)

even though he was older and you knew his time was limited to an extent, it's never, ever easy to lose a loved pet. and to have to make that loving and selfless decision to put a pet to rest makes it all that much harder!

he had a good long life with you and knew you loved him - please remember that and know that he was a happy puppy who loved you just as much as you loved him!!

i also want to apologize for your thread getting hijacked!! it is a good discussion though, and i think, helpful to all of us with pets.

another thing to keep in mind is plants that are poisonous to our pets. most houseplants can cause problems. i think there was another thread here about it. it could be one of the other forums i go to...not sure!

anyhoo, here's a link for the aspca site with poisonous info (foods as well as plants). it's a good site for all of us with pets to have in our favs/bookmarks!

http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=pro_apcc

as for taurine - yes, i know cats need it! ferrets need it also!! yes, cooking the meat does get rid of it so raw meat would be the way to go if you're not going to provide kibble (that's supplemented with taurine) as an additional food source or provide the supplement yourself if you're feeding cooked meat.

since our pets aren't out in the wild where their bodies would be able to deal with the various bacteria, raw meats should be par-boiled to kill surface germs. par-boiling is heating water to a rolling boil and putting the meat into it for at least a minute. as long as it's handled properly (kept properly chilled, par-boiled before serving) it's perfectly safe to give raw meat. i'm talking whole pieces here! i'd never give ground meat unless i was the one who ground it up. (i don't even eat ground meats myself! too many problems with it and you just don't know WHAT is in it!!)

another plus to raw meat is that it helps to keep the teeth cleaned properly (kibble doesn't clean the tooth surface well and canned stuff is even worse as it just sticks). the tendons in the meat and the bones help to clean away the tartar.

as for vets not approving or promoting raw diets, well then, they're doing a disserve to the animals they're supposed to be helping! these animals that we keep as pets weren't made to eat kibble!

if you feed raw and don't handle it properly, it's on you, not the vet, so i don't know why a vet would be worried about lawsuits!

if you want to provide a natural diet (raw) then the place to go IS your vet so that you can get the knowledge needed to provide a balanced diet that provides all the nutrients your particular animal requires to thrive! any vet that won't provide that info is not one i'd want to take my pets too. just my opinion...

and it mostly comes out of having ferrets. they're not quite like cats and dogs. their dietary needs are a quite bit different due to the high metabolism and short digestive tract they have. i've done a lot of research on my own and spoken with my vet (who is an expert on ferrets). he fully approves of the diet i provide them (grain-free kibble and a homemade cooked 'gravy') - and is behind me on starting to get them onto a completely natural diet (raw).

i'm just at the very beginning of 'going raw'. still in the early phases - no one has actually eaten the raw meat yet, lol, all they do investigate it when i put it out for them. mostly they've taken sniff or a lick or two and then stashed it. one actually did take a small, small nibble once - and then promptly stashed it (in the litter box, no less :shock: )!

ferrets can be pickier than cats when it comes to food and i've only offered them the wings a couple of times so far... we'll see how it goes!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 3:46 pm 
I don't know what to say Joclyn except that while I admire your convictions, I'll just have to agree to disagree.

While I don't have any pet ferrets at the moment the six I did have lived into double digit age, & they were fed a ferret-specific kibble diet composed of several different brands I mixed together.

Considering the normal lifespan of ferrets, I don't know how putting yourself or them through the rigors & possible contaminants & intestinal problems of a raw diet regime would make this more positive for them. Ferrets sold as pets aren't wild animals anymore. And, as one of my "ferret" vets once put it, they're probably pleased as hell that they don't have to take anymore chances choking on chicken - or any other - bones anymore & dying from intestinal bleeding just to get a square meal.

But again - I do realize that everyone is going to have different views on this. Raw food aficionados are going to be just as strong in their convictions as I am in mine. It's just a difference in opinion.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:43 pm 
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luv2grdn wrote:
The birds aren't necessarily getting their native diet, but it is better than what dogs and cats get.
The birds get dried biscuit based food with supplements the same way the cats and dogs do, the difference is that should you wish to supplement the dry and canned foods for dogs and cats you can feed them some raw meat and it's not dissimilar to what they'd eat in the wild, of course that idea is a little odd considering that they're both heavily domesticated animals and a wild diet is largely irrelevant, but should you wish to find some nectar laden tropical flowers and the fruit of large forest trees, completely unpalatable to humans, you'll have a job.

luv2grdn wrote:
Good point about the hybridized fruits. There are some who believe they're not good for humans either. Time will tell...

I didn't mention hybridised fruit, we've been cultivating and selectively breeding both plants and animals for a very long time, it's not something that we need more time to tell.

luv2grdn wrote:
Grass fed beef has higher levels of Omega 3 fatty acids, which protect your circulatory system from the problems grain fed beef causes. Media has touted red meat as being bad for so long that it's hard to believe it can actually be good for you if the animal is raised properly. But there is still a lot unknown, so there may be different things said about it sometime in the future.

Does red meat fed on grass completely eliminate all the other supposed dangers? I can eat mackerel, and frequently do, for Omega 3 if i so wish.
luv2grdn wrote:
I've always heard that ground meat is riskier to eat rare because of the fact that grinding it mixes the bacteria throughout it.

But then, dogs, the mongrels with varied genetics at any rate, are tough animals and supermarket prepacked minced red meat probably wouldn't pose any serious problems for them raw.

joclyn wrote:
if you want to provide a natural diet (raw) then the place to go IS your vet so that you can get the knowledge needed to provide a balanced diet that provides all the nutrients your particular animal requires to thrive! any vet that won't provide that info is not one i'd want to take my pets too. just my opinion...

Most vets would probably suggest one of the many high tech off the shelf dry diets if you're particularly worried about nutrition, they can almost certainly sell said product to you too.
Breezy wrote:
Frankly, I think you can "overthink" all this pet dietary stuff (& I don't mean last year's pet food debacle). All my animals have lived to ripe old ages - well into their very late teens. Even my extremely large dogs. I'm happy, my vets are happy, my animals are happy. :D

Agreed, just because a pet's diet isn't absolutely perfect doesn't mean that they can't be perfectly happy and healthy animals.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 10:09 pm 
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I too should apologize for my part in hijacking this thread and not considering your loss. I'm sorry. It sounds like he did ok in spite of his love of chocolate.

I should say that our pets are on commercial food. The cats get canned food since the distemper surviver can't eat kibble and the dog gets a mix of canned and kibble. She'd probably do better if I made her food, but it's not something I can do at this time. She has had various digestive problems most of her life and bladder and/or kidney problems. We now have her on a grain free food and it seems to help.

My daughter needs her computer back. Later...


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:22 am 
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Quote:
(P.S. The raw diet thing is EXTREMELY controversial these days. Actually - for both animals & PEOPLE. I've yet to come across a veterinary (or human medical) professional I respect who'd recommend it, & it has nothing to do with lawsuits.)


My comment came from what I have heard from vets. If you feed a pet raw food you are running the risk of exposing yourself and anyone in your home or anyone in contact with your pet to food poisoning. I'm also sure there are vets who don't recomend it because they don't agree with the raw diet.



Quote:
Foxy, I'd think raw meat would be safer to handle if it is seared first, just heating the outer parts where the bacteria live, but maybe there's more to it than that. I've always heard that ground meat is riskier to eat rare because of the fact that grinding it mixes the bacteria throughout it.


Searing the meat may make it safer to handle, but the problem doesn't lie in handling the food... as long as you wash up after working with it. The problem is cats lick themselves to clean up. A dogs mouth comes in contact with many items in your home too. Eating raw meat gets the bacteria in their mouth and they spread it all over the place. Turns out that the bacteria can be present all throughout the meat, not just in ground meat. Although ground meat tends to be worse. The animal may be able to deal with the bactera, but a lot of humans can't.

Quote:
So, cats need taurine, right, i have the solution. Take your animals off their dry biscuit feed and replace it with cornflakes and red bull!

:lol:

Quote:
oh, btw, there's another recall that was just announced the other day! same brands/products as before - rice gluten this time instead of the wheat as before. looks to be the same company that manufactures all those different brands is still getting product from that same company in china as almost all the same brand names are on the list of recalled items!


I'm curious, where did you see or hear about this recall? I have searched and can't find anything.

Foxy.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:03 pm 
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sorry!!! i thought i'd put a link in for the fda site!!

here it is!


http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/petfoodrecall/


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 Post subject: Recall
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:39 pm 
And you won't find anything new Foxy, because there ISN'T anything new to find.

Joclyn - just because the FDA puts an update "date" on their internet list - which they do periodically, doesn't mean that there's new info to glean. And they don't remove all the old recalls because pet food (& canned food for humans) frequently has a 2-year+ expiration date. That's why these recalls are still on the FDA list - because food that was processed back in March '07 could very well still be out there in someone's cupboard since it would have an expiry date of '09. And someone who had pets & lived under a rock all last spring might not have heard about all the recalls - lol!!

Before anyone gets their panties in a hysterical bunch & starts tossing out pet food, there has NOT been a massive new pet food recall. I just now picked - at random 10 of the cat & dog foods on that list & visited their sites. All of the recall info was from the original March '07 incident. Some were major companies; some small.

Do you really believe after last year's debacle & loss of customer goodwill that all these companies wouldn't be publically advertising voluntary recalls if this was happening again? Or that it wouldn't be in the news - at least for a handful of all these companies?

My suggestion if you're concerned is to visit the FDA site & then visit the company site that produces whatever food you're feeding. All of them have a "recall" page. If the newest info dates back to Spring 2007, just pat Rover or Ginger on the head & give them another biscuit. Geesh.

(Edited to add that - just for the heck of it & to make sure I wasn't talking out of my - ahem - hat - I e-mailed a few of these companies & specifically asked them about the updated FDA list & to explain why they're still listed with '09 & 10 expiry dates. I'll report back as I hear back.)


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 3:23 pm 
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Phil, I wasn't aware of the current bird food. When we had our parrot, the only choice was seed mixes and whatever I added in addition.

I can't say if grass fed beef would eliminate all problems associated with it, but from what I've read and from conversations with some doctors, it is far better than grain fattened cattle. The omega 3 & 6 balance is better, which lessens or eliminates the inflammation problem associated with beef consumption. There are other factors in gf beef too, that are a benefit to one's health. Maybe this is what is contributing to pet's health problems too for all I know. I wasn't meaning to start any debate, so I'll end the talk about it since it's OT and doesn't pertain to the original post. I've hijacked it more than enough! :oops:

Foxy, I've had that same concern, especially with kids around. Dogs like to lick people! I've heard some say that it's not a problem, but I'll wait for proof of that.

The FDA is understaffed and behind, so I wonder if they're on top of the problem pet foods. Maybe it's just the human food and drugs affected by it. Scary with all the new drugs that come out every year.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 3:23 pm 
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Quote:
sorry!!! i thought i'd put a link in for the fda site!!


The FDA was the first place I went to when I saw your warning to see if I had missed something in the email warnings. The only recalls are from the 07 disaster and there is a bunch of updates about the court cases relating to what happened last year.

For anyone who is concerned about recalls, I suggest signing up to the FDA's email list. I did this last year during the pet food recalls.

Thanks Breezy!

Foxy.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:30 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2007 5:02 pm
Posts: 553
Location: philly
you are correct foxy. it looks like the site was updated due to the recent indictments that were handed down and only for that reason.

someone on one of my ferret forums posted links after receiving an email stating there was a new recall. i took a quick look around and none of what i use is on it, so i didn't investigate any further. my bad!

this would have been a better link as it lists things by date:

http://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/petfood.html

as for that other page, the fda should include the date of recall as well as the expire dates!! that just makes sense, doesn't it?

i DID think that the original recall was for wheat gluten, not rice gluten though. /shrug


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 10:06 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 2:30 pm
Posts: 811
Location: Raleigh, NC
Thanks to all for the good thoughts about my old friend.
That was over 15 years ago and still I am sitting here tearing up reading these posts.
That could probably be a new topic...perhaps....."Tributes to Our Best Friends".
This thread was/is in no way hijacked. I only brought my chocoholic friend up because he shared chocolate with me for 16 years. I thank goodness that he was saved from my ignorance. I hope through sharing of information that some might be more aware, as I am now with my 12 & 6 year old cats, and 5 year old dog (part black lab/ part Tasmanian..from rescue).

_________________
Susan Quinby-Honer
Red Hen Enterprises
Starve the Landfill...Feed the Earth


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2008 12:03 am 
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Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 11:26 pm
Posts: 1592
Quote:
i DID think that the original recall was for wheat gluten, not rice gluten though. /shrug


At first it was all about the wheat gluten then later in the whole mess they started discovering problems with the rice. I followed that recall very closely last year since it started with in days of loosing my one cat to kidney failure. His was not caused by the contaminated food. I was in fear of loosing the rest to the contaminated food.

Quote:
That could probably be a new topic...perhaps....."Tributes to Our Best Friends".


I like that idea, RedHen. I would love to hear more about your dear chocoholic friend. If you have pictures I would love to see them too.

Foxy.


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