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 Post subject: worm ID
PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 1:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:34 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Canada
*moved in an attempt to un-hijack a thread

I was hoping to maybe compare notes/links/photos of worm species to help identify some worms.

From what i understand tiger worms(eisenia fetida) are a bit shorter and skinnier with somewhat more pointed ends/beginnings?

The red worm (lumbricus rubellus) besides lacking the striping are fatter and longer?

http://vro.dpi.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/vrosi ... _worm_wise has a nicely organised description of some species down under and i'm hoping someone might help with a similar link for Canada/U.S..

Or maybe we could start one? or consolidate or ... ?

worming up north is slow

:)


Last edited by Northworm on Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: worm ID
PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:34 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Canada
One good thing about losing bookmarks/research is you are forced to look again.

AbbeysDad started me thinking about the 14 rm bins of finished vc i need to separate/process and remake the beds. I know i have possibly ?3? species of worms and have some issues with the deeper digging variety. So i'm on a mission to positively identify my worms and start some selective breeding. I figured it might be worthwhile to spread the worm love a bit.

If it's wrong to poach so much info please advise.

from http://nurturing-nature.co.uk/compostin ... omposting/

Dendrodrilus rubidus

This small earthworm ranges in colour from dark red to pink on the upper surface, being paler below. It often has a conspicuous yellow tip to its tail, from which it gets the anglers’ name of gilt tail. It is common in the surface layer of decomposing leaves in woodland, and can sometimes be seen underneath the bark of decaying logs. It can be found under dung in pastures and is often very abundant in compost and manure heaps.

Eisenia fetida

This moderate-sized earthworm has a very distinctive striped appearance. The pink to purplish red pigmentation occurs in bands separated by unpigmented areas which have a yellowish hue. The red pigmentation is largely restricted to the upper surface of the body.

The common names of brandling and tiger worm refer to the stripy appearance, the red streaks supposedly resembling brand marks. The brandling is sometimes found in deep woodland leafmould. It can be extremely abundant in manure and compost heaps. When the worm is irritated it exudes a musty (foetid) yellow fluid onto the body through small pores on the upper surface. This seems to be a defence against predators, the characteristic red and yellow stripes being a warning to predators to leave it well alone.

This species grows and reproduces extremely quickly and is much used in worm farming. Although far from being a typical earthworm in its way of life this species is frequently used to test the toxicity of soil pollutants. Widely used in many parts of the world, including USA and Australia for composting and for good reason.

Eisenia andrei

This species differs from Eisenia fetida in only one easily visible feature: it is uniformly reddish in colour. Eisenia andrei and Eisenia fetida are sometimes regarded as the same species, though some call this species the red tiger worm.

Eisenia hortensis(European Nightcrawler)

This is a small earthworm that has a pinkish colouration at the front end of the body but is mainly greyish in colour when, as is usually the case, the gut is full of soil. When it has not been feeding it is pale pink in colour. The tip of the tail is cream or pale yellow. This species is found in deep woodland litter and in garden soils that are rich in organic matter, including under compost heaps. Make a better fisherman bait than composting food waste worm.

Eisenia veneta

This earthworm is like a large version of Eisenia fetida, with its stripy
appearance and the same habit of exuding yellow fluid onto its skin when irritated. It is also found in the same kinds of habitat, which can include leaf litter, manure heaps, organic rich soils, garden compost heaps and wet, decaying leaf litter.

Lumbricus terrestris

Our largest British earthworm is purplish red above, the pigmentation often being largely present at the front end of the body, on the upper surface. The tail is often distinctly flattened at the end. Lumbricus terrestris is found in a wide range of soils. It burrows deeply, down to over a metre, but stretches out onto the soil surface at night to feed on plant debris and mate. Regularly seen mating on lawns during the night and on lawns after a heavy downpour.

The hind end of the body usually remains in the burrow, anchoring the worm so that if danger threatens it can rapidly retreat to safety. A popular angling bait, this species has a variety of common names including lob and dew worm and night crawler. Feeds on decaying plant materials and fallen leaves. Does not make a suitable candidate for composting!


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 Post subject: Re: worm ID
PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:34 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Canada
http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/identification/index.html

http://www.naturewatch.ca/english/wormw ... worms.html

These two sites provide some good information for identifying worms in Canada and probably the northern U.S. as well.


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 Post subject: Re: worm ID
PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 11:51 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 8:31 pm
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Tiger worms, also known as red wriggler worms, or simply redworms, are a type of composting worm. These worms, typically identified by the scientific name Eisenia fetida, are generally reddish-brown in color and often seem to have stripes, because their bodies are segmented. Tiger worms typically have no eyes or ears, but are usually able to detect heat, light, and movement in the soil around them. These worms do not have any teeth, but use a combination of digestive enzymes and small particles of debris within their bodies to break down and digest their food. Tiger worms can take in both water and air directly through their skin, and they are generally hermaphroditic, so that they can mate and reproduce without the benefit of a partner.

The species of worm commonly known as the tiger worm usually lives on the soil's surface, or no deeper below the surface than about 10 inches (25.4 centimeters). Tiger worms typically thrive best at temperatures between 68 and 77° Fahrenheit (20 to 25° Celsius). They usually can't survive temperatures higher than 90° Fahrenheit (32.2 Celsius). Tiger worms usually need plenty of moisture in their soil environment, and are said to prefer soil that contains 43 to 90 percent water. The ideal soil pH for this species of worm is believed to range from five to nine on the Blakemore pH scale.

Lumbricus rubellus is a species of earthworm that is related to Lumbricus terrestris. It is usually reddish brown or reddish violet, iridescent dorsally, and pale yellow ventrally. They are usually about 25 millimetres (0.98 in) to 105 millimetres (4.1 in) in length, with around 95-120 segments. Their native distribution was mainland Europe and the British Isles, but they have currently spread worldwide in suitable habitats.

In traditional Chinese medicine, abdominal extracts from Lumbricus rubellus are used in a preparation known as Di Long, or Earth Dragon, for treatment of rheumatic, phlegm and blood disorders.


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