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 Post subject: Springtails.
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2012 12:47 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:13 pm
Posts: 20
One of my worm-breeding bins (3 gal) has springtails and getting more. How can I get rid of them? I'm trying to contain it to just this 1 bin.
Any other method before I buy Hypoaspis mites?


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 Post subject: Re: Springtails.
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2012 2:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:43 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Upstate New York
Slow down there cowboy...any talk of mites is a case of "the cure being worse than the disease".
Sadly I don't have a solution for springtails. If I ever had them, I ignored them. But I pretty much wrangle wild worms so whatever is in the heap is in the heap. I even have a fair number of pill bugs in the basement bin from the EarthMachine compost. They're there...I tolerate.

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 Post subject: Re: Springtails.
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 12:40 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:13 pm
Posts: 20
OK, now: short of buying those hypoapsis mites, this is what I did.
For almost 3 weeks now I didn't feed that bin. They still have left over and the moist bedding to work through and corn husks I threw in before the 3 weeks. I have fine powdered egg shells and threw a thin layer on areas where I see springtails on the surface. Checked it every 2 or 3 days and repeat. I do not have litmus paper to test pH but it looks that every time I checked there seemed to be less visible springtail and powdered egg shell. This means to me the VC is too acid and the egg shell is neutralizing it. Am I correct?
Here and there I lift the corn husk and threw egg shell where I saw clumps of springtails.
My question, does springtail thrive in acid condition, like mites?


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 Post subject: Re: Springtails.
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:34 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Canada
I'm with Abbeysdad on tolerating springtails.

They seem to enjoy overly moist bins so I'm wondering if, in addition to changing the ph, the powdered shells are absorbing some moisture.

My bins are relatively springtail free these days but i haven't fed them much and they are definitely on the dry side as a result

just some thoughts


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 Post subject: Re: Springtails.
PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 5:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:13 pm
Posts: 20
Anybody in here with ANY suggestions how to get rid (or at least minimize) springtails in a worm bin? Please, please, please.


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 Post subject: Re: Springtails.
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 3:34 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 4:12 pm
Posts: 172
Location: Richmond, VA Zone 7
I think you already have your answers:

Stop feeding the bin until the worms have consumed all the added food.

Add dry bedding to help dry out the bin.

Lightly sprinkle the bin with either powered egg shells or garden lime to help soak up some of the moisture & raise the pH slightly.

Like Ed, I have never tried to get a worm bin that was just strictly worms. There will always be other forms of critters in there helping to break down the food and I just accept that & let everyone feast on the banquet I provide.

The best you can hope for is to maintain your bin so that you keep all the critters in balance & make any needed changes if anyone of them gets the upper hand & begins to make a nuisance of itself. Springtails are not a bad thing to have in your bin. Like pot worms, their presence is merely an indicator of the current state of your bin.

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 Post subject: Re: Springtails.
PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 11:26 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 8:31 pm
Posts: 58
Springtails are tiny insects. Their size ranges from 1/32” to 1/8”. They get their name from a spring-like structure, called the furcula. It is located on the back of their abdomen. It is normally curled under the body. When the insect is disturbed, it unfolds the furcula instantly. This causes the insect to jump. One jump can cover three or four inches.Springtails normally live in damp soil. They eat mold and fungus. They are common in flowerbeds, under logs, paving stones, and landscape timbers. Woodpiles are also a common place for springtails to hide.

Springtails do not bite or sting people. They do not damage buildings or the contents. They develop quickly. It is common to find springtails in very large numbers. The fact that there can be thousands of jumping insects in an area can be very distressing to homeowners.

When the dampness is corrected, the springtails disappear very quickly. Eliminating dampness is very important in preventing or eliminating springtails. A thorough inspection is the first step. :wink:


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