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<  Composting, Mulch, and Soils  ~  Mushroom "stuff".

PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:24 pm
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 12:07 pmPosts: 48
I live in an area that Mushrooms are the business of choice. I have access to all kinds of different "stuff."

I can think of 3 different types that exist.

The first would the straw hay and manure ect that they mix with the spawn(or seed) and fills the lower 75percent of the bed. They call this compost and it is usually steaming.

The second would be just black and fluffy?????????? with white balls. This is used to cover the first layer. It looks kinda like potting soil you would buy in a store. They call this top soil. My buddy uses it when he plants anything.

The third is the first 2 after it has been used. I am sure it has chemicals in it, as well as fungis.


My question is can I use any of this for anything?

I thought the third could be used for next year. Get a few compost piles going this year for next year. A years time would be enough for the chemicals to make their way out of it.

Last year I used the second layer in the garden and have no real opinion givin the fact that I have never tried in this garden without it.



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 10:49 am
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 5:35 pmPosts: 162Location: NH zone 4/5
I think if I was to have a truck load fall off the truck in my back yard, I might set up as many new raised beds as I could muster with it, I'd let the contents sit for a week or three before planting would then expand into my new beds.

Much of the urea added to mushroom bedding is consumed my the 'shrooms themselves.

If I had to take on several truck loads I might start composting it if for no other reason than to work in some rock phosphate and crushed limestone/oyster shell into the new plunder.

90 days out from building a new bed with mushroom 'compost' the product aught to pass as organic. Thats just my take on this.

The worst of what is added to 'shroom soil is urea to make it heat up and self-pasturise.



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 3:11 pm
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 12:07 pmPosts: 48
Tomc wrote:
I think if I was to have a truck load fall off the truck in my back yard, I might set up as many new raised beds as I could muster with it, I'd let the contents sit for a week or three before planting would then expand into my new beds.

Much of the urea added to mushroom bedding is consumed my the 'shrooms themselves.

If I had to take on several truck loads I might start composting it if for no other reason than to work in some rock phosphate and crushed limestone/oyster shell into the new plunder.

90 days out from building a new bed with mushroom 'compost' the product aught to pass as organic. Thats just my take on this.

The worst of what is added to 'shroom soil is urea to make it heat up and self-pasturise.



You are referring to the old stuff?

If so what about the new stuff?

How about shiitake logs?



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 7:14 pm
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 5:35 pmPosts: 162Location: NH zone 4/5
Quote:
You are referring to the old stuff?


Yes, yes I am.

Quote:
If so what about the new stuff?


Depends on how much it cost you. Most 'shroom compost is mostly horse poop. Most of the top dressing is promix, which is largely peat. IMO its too pricey (the promix that is). Its also too dearth of most of what an organic gardener wants as part of their micro-herd of flora what makes soil fertile.

Quote:
How about shiitake logs?


Now to my old eyes dropping in an off topic segway of shiitake logs is at best lazy. But, seeing as you asked, even though I doubt you really want an answer--here goes.

Permaculturists who want to grow both woody and annual plants might be very interested in shiitake logs as a sub soil addition. IE they would dig a trench and bury such logs deeply as a host for fungal growth.

Woody plants, oh fruiting trees and such live at least in part in a symbiotic relationship with mycelia (my Latin is bad, mushroom families); much more than most annual plants.

Annuals (that'd be mostly veggies and flowers) use soil nutrients obtained from bacterial action.

So, it depends on what you plan to grow, how big your wallet is, and how hard you wanna work.

I shovel in bark mulch every couple years onto the few permaculture beds I maintain.

Sooner or later somebody is going to question if high carbon items doesn't steal available nitrogen from your garden. The short answer is "no". Tell the person who insists that wood will steal available nitrogen needs to find a citation that it will, (that aughta keep em busy for a few lifetimes...).



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 8:10 pm
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 12:07 pmPosts: 48
As far as sneaking in the shiitake logs the topic was "mushroom stuff" How about the things they grow oysters on?

I would not say I have an infinite supply but I made a lot of friends and could get a few small dump trucks of any of the stuff I mentioned.

So if price is not an issue get the new "top soil" and mix it in with the other garden soil for the veggies.

Compost both old and new bottom layer.

And use shiitake logs around trees.



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 21, 2010 9:33 pm
User avatarJoined: Fri Dec 25, 2009 4:17 pmPosts: 8Location: Lekkerkerk, Netherlands
Hi Raiden,


I use the bedding, the bottom and top layer in total on a clay garden.
It fluffs up the clay a lot.
There are no chemicals in it at all, the only problem might be salts, at least here in the EU.
The water used to dampen it is re-used over and over again, and not allowed to put in the sewer system or dumped.
Not a problem on a garden though.

The maximum effectively used on a garden is 37.5 Kg per sq meter ( sorry, too tired to convert )
Tried and tested, that amount has the best effect on the soil, I can give you a link, but it all is in Dutch.
What will happen to the stuff is rather easy.
The first nutrients will be taken by all the plants in it, and the second "wave" will be slower, and last longer.
The second wave is caused by earthworms breaking it down, and make the slow food for the plants.
The effect will last 3 years, and you can keep things up by adding 1/3rd of the original amount yearly.

Pre composting is not needed, as worms will brake it down slow. If you do pre-compost, then more food will be going in the soil immediately, and the effect will last shorter.

If you water this stuff down, it almost is the perfect worm food for red worms and tiger worms.


Cheers Bart



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