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 Post subject: Cutting truckolads.
PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 2:00 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:51 am
Posts: 2
Last week I cut some truckload of tree and the area of cut off will be painted with black color. Is it recommended?

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 Post subject: Re: Cutting truckolads.
PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 3:40 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 5:35 pm
Posts: 177
Location: NH zone 4/5
Same, If I think I'm understanding your question: (should you paint the wounds on trees--shrubs you pruned).

The short answer is maybe not. I don't paint mine. If you want those pruning cuts to be less noticable rub some dirt on the cuts.

I find that painting wounds slows healing. YMMV.

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 Post subject: Re: Cutting truckolads.
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 2:14 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 3:29 pm
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Location: Sunol, CA (9B)
As I understand it, painting the wound prevents rot/disease from getting at the bare wound, and reduces how far into the wounded area that the wood dries out and dies back, reducing the amount of healing the tree needs to do.

I paint tar on most wounds greater than 1/2" diameter. The tar is visible for quite a while, but I haven't had anything bad happen.

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 Post subject: Re: Cutting truckolads.
PostPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 10:31 pm 
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The only suggestions I have is to make sure your tools are nice and sharp. I have never painted any of my cuts. Always consider things like making your cuts angled so moisture will not stay and roll away from the area.

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 Post subject: Re: Cutting truckolads.
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:58 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:14 pm
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I have never painted mine either. I did some trimming back in June, and I am already seeing the tree heal itself. The cuts are no longer noticeable from far away, and I have not noticed any significant damage to the tree. You might consult a pruner or tree trimming company in your area for localized info. Angie's List can provide you with some names if you are not familiar with any off the top of your head.


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 Post subject: Re: Cutting truckolads.
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 3:22 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 1:30 pm
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Location: Puyallup, Washington
I would think one could access Angie's List to find a reputable tree trimming contractor whom hopefully would be willing to provide you with an opinion as to whether or not you should "paint" tree wounds resulting from trimming. Personally, I have had success with both approaches in that I have painted some wounds while not painting others. Regardless, if one was to use tar (which is what I have used), while it was still hot, you could coat the tar with loose soil (such as sand) to provide a bit of "camouflage".


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 Post subject: Re: Cutting truckolads.
PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 10:12 pm 
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Location: Tucson, Arizona
At least in the hot parts of Arizona there are 2 schools of thought. I have tried both with success.
One school, at least for our desert adapted legume trees, is only cut big branches while sap is flowing so the leaking sap will move out any infections. A bit messy with Mesquite but it works for me. After several months I will rinse any high stained areas.

The other school, many times the professional arborists, spray the cut ends with a sealant. If the sealant is thick enough it should stop leakage.

One other group recommends cutting only during slow sap movement (winter here). Healing is slow IMO and the odds of infection or infestation increase. This method worked good for me in more norther climates, Oregon, Washington and some of northern California.
Totally different trees though and I have not nor do I plan to do so in Tucson, AZ.

Angled cut is a good rule. It need not be a sharp angle only enough so there is no opportunity for moisture or whatever to accumulate.

Enjoy,
AZED

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