The Garden Forums

Dig In!
It is currently Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:51 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 1:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 12:01 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Branson MO/Zone6
I'm going to make a kitchen spice garden out of a flower bed and so far have rosemary, basil,oregano and sage. I don't think I'd use mint, but would like to know what other suggestions you might have for choices.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 6:56 am
Posts: 34
Location: Raleigh
Congrats on starting your spice garden....

I am growing everything you are growing, might I also suggest chives, parsley, marjoram, french tarragon and thyme. Chives are a great cut and grow plant and comeback stronger each year. If I let them flower in the spring they are beautiful. Also, I never have to buy green onions at the store anymore.

Also, depending on the space available I suggest growing two or three different varieties of the herbs you have planted. I have pineapple sage along with classic sage. I grow Thai and Lemon Basil along with my basic Genovese.

I am growing three types of Thyme, one creeping, one lemon and the other English. This year I am going to add Mexican Oregano to go along with my Greek.

By growing the different varieties, I like the subtle changes each plant has to offer.

Concerning Mint.... I never grow mint until a two years ago because I had heard how invasive it was. But I got a small transplant at a plant swap, but it in a 3 gallon container and couldn't be any happier. It grows great and during the summer months, I can cut 2 big handfuls a week and have it grow right back. I use it to make sweet mint tea. Last year, I picked up Chocolate Mint and love it also. It tastes like one of those Andes Chocolate mints.

Concerning Flowers.... My spice garden is also a former flower bed but over time I have reincorporated tall perennials. They just make for a more interesting look.

Best of Luck.....

P.S. I know herbs generally grow in poor soil, but mine really take off each year once I top dress the bed with compost.

_________________
Life is short, plant something!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 12:01 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Branson MO/Zone6
Thanks!

I'll try some variety and may even try the mint. The chocolate mint sounds particularly intriguing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sun Apr 04, 2010 9:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 7:50 pm
Posts: 57
Location: SE Michigan
I grow some obscure stuff that even *I* don't actually use, just because I love herb gardens :roll: , but I second the adding of chives, and maybe garlic chives, and also mint-in-a-pot. i would probably add dill to the easy-basic list. And a heads-up on oregano.

One of the best thing about chives is that they come back **so** early! Just about the time the snowdrops are in bloom, the chives are starting up. By the time the daffodils are up and starting to bud, you can start harvesting young chives for dinner. It is good for the soul to go out and trim fresh greens from the garden even before the weeds have started. Just cut the flowers back before they set seed, or they can put out lots of little nuisances.

Mint is excellent to have. Great for tea, or iced tea, and if you chop up some to put in a summer fruit salad.... Heaven! Wonderful in various pasta salads, all kinds of middle eastern foods. And just feels good to pluck and chew a few leaves on a hot summer day. Just keep it in a pot.

Dill is also a great thing to have. Easy to grow, and you can use the plant in many things, and the seeds are good in others. Also, the seeds are a very easy save-and-replant if you are in a colder area were it won't reseed by itself.

Oregano, in some areas, can become a spreading problem like mint. (They are both in the 'mint family'.) At least in my yard, it spreads aggressively. You might want to put it in a pot, or in tiles, or in a small separate bed of its own. It's worth having, but it can try to take over the herb garden if uncontrolled.

And I agree with computer gardener. Although a lot of references say that many herbs thrive in poor soil and dry conditions, most do better in reasonable garden soil with a normal amount of water.

I'm glad you're starting an herb garden! Enjoy, and keep experimenting!

_________________
To find your roots, get your hands in soil. To live fully in the present, imagine your garden and make it happen. To see all of reality, spend some time sitting quietly in the garden.... Then get your hands back in the dirt.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 6:02 pm
Posts: 1630
Location: PNW
I have oregano gone wild, so I prefer the better behaved herbs like rosemary and thyme. But you know how diligent you'd be about not letting them go to seed. I wish you success and enjoyment and good eating!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 6:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 7:50 pm
Posts: 57
Location: SE Michigan
For me, the oregano actually spreads by runners.... enthusiastically! A few years ago, I dug it all out, gave a lot away, dried a huge bunch of it, and then planted it in a restricted area. Now I treat the oregano, and the lemon balm (another mint cousin), just like the ordinary mints. Works out fine.

And ditto on the happy eating!

_________________
To find your roots, get your hands in soil. To live fully in the present, imagine your garden and make it happen. To see all of reality, spend some time sitting quietly in the garden.... Then get your hands back in the dirt.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 11:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 3:29 pm
Posts: 948
Location: Sunol, CA (9B)
My oregano has also 'gone native' and comes up as a weed in potted plants, but it's relatively well behaved for a weed, stays small and doesn't tolerate much pulling.

Mint generally does not go to seed, but I also have it's cousin, lemon balm - holy heck that stuff is aggressive. Seedlings come up everywhere and the plants get big. I haven't had trouble pulling seedlings, but haven't neglected them to the point where I had rhizomes all over the place.

I'd also add chervil to the list. This is my first year growing it, but from what I've sampled of my seedlings :oops: I'm happy with it.

I have sage, but don't really use it. It looks nice though, particularly the variegated one. Most of the thymes are also more for show, I have 'silver queen' and a golden lemon thyme, but both taste weird when used in cooking.. I haven't even tried using wooly thyme or elfin thyme.

_________________
The best time to sow is 5 years ago.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 11:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:55 am
Posts: 7
I also recommend that you plant chives, parsley, tarragon, thyme and mint (in a pot). I would also like to add to your list of choices: garlic, ginger, cumin and dill. Since it's spring, you can definitely plant cumin and dill. Maybe you can plant ginger on a pot as well because it needs to be placed indoors when winter has come. I have it in my garden and I've use it often in my cooking. Makes my dishes especially stir-frieds flavorful.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 5:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 6:02 pm
Posts: 1630
Location: PNW
I've never heard about oregano having runners. I'll have to pull some up and see.

I also have lemon balm. It does very well here, unfortunately.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 7:50 pm
Posts: 57
Location: SE Michigan
StorageShedSmart,

Are you talking the tropical gingers (Zingiber sp.), useful in cooking, similar to what's found in grocery stores? I didn't know that could be grown here at all, and would be *very* interested in more info. There are rarely things that I will bother to pull inside in the fall, but a big pot of this would be something I would be willing to fuss over. I guess I always assumed that they needed an incredibly long growing season....

We grow the Asarum species, American and European ginger, but have always seen them as nice shade ground covers. They winter over beautifully, but are pretty useless in cooking.

Any info you can share on growing cooking ginger would be greatly appreciated. Can you just plant the roots from the store as starters, or are those treated to prevent sprouting? If you can, then do they want full sun? I would love to grow these out, and be able to harvest some. Would love to hear about your experience doing this. Thanks!

And you grow cumin.... Lordy, we use a lot of cumin here. Didn't know I could grow it here. I will do some looking up.

_________________
To find your roots, get your hands in soil. To live fully in the present, imagine your garden and make it happen. To see all of reality, spend some time sitting quietly in the garden.... Then get your hands back in the dirt.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 7:50 pm
Posts: 57
Location: SE Michigan
PrometheanSpark,

I agree on the chervil. And no :oops: needed. If you don't .... ummm ... *thin* the seedlings, you won't have a clue as to what they taste like, and how to use them when they grow up :lol:

Re thymes, yeah, there are lots of them. Many of them pretty, and they can smell good, but are useless beyond that. For cooking, I stick to the common thyme, Thymus vulgaris. I know there are those who use some of the other scented thymes, but I've never much liked the tastes.

In my area, oregano takes over ground quickly, but is loosely rooted, and pretty easy to peel back. Lemon balm doesn't tend to throw seedlings here, but it spreads out in a solid phalanx, like a disciplined army, and roots heavily before putting up the smallest sprouts. Much harder to weed out. But I just get out a shovel and get fierce in spring. We use a lot of it, so it's worth the fight.

_________________
To find your roots, get your hands in soil. To live fully in the present, imagine your garden and make it happen. To see all of reality, spend some time sitting quietly in the garden.... Then get your hands back in the dirt.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2007 5:02 pm
Posts: 553
Location: philly
basil, thyme, oregano, rosemary, sorrel, tarragon, chervil, sage, chives, dill, garlic, onions, nasturtium, horseradish, lavendar, mint - the list goes on and on!! and i know i'm forgetting at least 2 things i've got growing!

what herbs do you use in your cooking??? those should be the first things you put in. then try some of the other things suggested and see if you like them or not.

also, are you looking for things to enhance foods or for herbals to use in teas??

there are lots of flowers that are used in teas - coneflowers, nasturtium, roses (both petals and hips), and quite a few more!

sage, sorrel, mint, lavendar, chives are all perennial in zone 6. i think nasturiums are too. and garlic and onion are - they get planted in the fall for spring/summer harvesting.

i didn't know oregano could be a problem...first year i got some. will have to investigate if it's hardy here or not (and if so, will keep it potted).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 10:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 12:01 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Branson MO/Zone6
Thanks for all of the input. I've decided to go with rosemary, thyme, flatleaf and curly parsley, sage, chives, basil and oregano. This pretty occupies the available space. (The oregano will stay in a pot.)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 12:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 3:29 pm
Posts: 948
Location: Sunol, CA (9B)
Nasturtium are annuals that come back each year from seed. One is growing in my narcissus, don't know where it came from, but presumably it'll be back next year - in greater numbers.

_________________
The best time to sow is 5 years ago.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Fri Jul 22, 2011 6:04 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 4:40 am
Posts: 32
Location: Australia
Garden awning are also a great feature because they look good and if you enjoy entertaining in your garden they add that extra bit of protection and warmth for your comfort as well as you can spice up your garden.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:42 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 1:40 am
Posts: 5
Great for tea, or iced tea, and if you chop up some to put in a summer fruit salad. And Heaven! Wonderful in various pasta salads, all kinds of middle eastern foods. And just feels good to pluck and chew a few leaves on a hot summer day. Just keep it in a pot.

_________________
Pasadena Fitness


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Spice Garden
PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2013 1:46 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2013 1:24 am
Posts: 7
Spice garden is the best I have a I have oregano at my place and it is good.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group Maintained by Rewired Media