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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 7:53 pm 
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I want to grow garlic, begining this October. I came across this passage on the web.

"Soak each varieties' cloves in water containing one heaping tablespoon of bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) and liquid seaweed to protect them from fungus as well as give them an energy boost. Leave the cloves in the soda water overnight or long enough for the clove covers to loosen so the liquid comes into contact with the surfaces of the cloves. Garlics clove covers can contain fungal spores, or conidia or the eggs of pests such as mites and are best discarded rather than planted since the first thing the cloves do is to shed them, anyway. The baking soda helps neutralize the fungi. Commercial growers don't have time to peel cloves bare but gardeners do.

The cloves should then be soaked in rubbing alcohol or 140 proof vodka for three or four minutes and then planted immediately. The alcohol kills pests and pest eggs and any pathogens the first soaking missed."

Is this accurate? If so, where do I get "liquid seaweed"??

Is a alcohol part accurate?

Has anyone planted garlic cloves bought at the grocery store?

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 1:41 am 
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I've never heard any of what you quoted and I've never known of anyone soaking them at all before planting. I'd just stick them in the ground and wait.
Good luck!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:12 pm 
I also agree with Luv2grdn here. That sounds like a whole lot of nonsense from someone who has way WAY too much time on their hands & not enough sense.

Whether from a supermarket (although you may not get great results, depending on the type &/or age of the heads) or from a seed company, just plant those unpeeled cloves in good soil & wait for spring. :)


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 6:07 pm 
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all i've ever heard is stick them in the ground in october/november and wait for them to grow. using cloves from store-bought bulbs is fine - just seperate and plant.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 10:17 am 
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Well, if anyone still cares........ I know it's been along time between posts!!

I finally planted garlic, and as everyone said, ya pretty much just stick it in the ground!! Last November, I put them in; Mediteranian Stiff-Necks, and a German Red Soft-neck. (not sure of the names) Both are up and doing very well, 2-3" high.

Very excited!!

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 10:57 am 
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The stiff necks will make a mock seed head with bulbils in it-them. If you leave them on they can be directly planted from plant late August-September. If you just eat the bulbils the regular cloves will get bigger.

Its sort of a win-win situation.

Be well
Tom C

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 12:07 pm 
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i'm glad you had success!!! i'm going to be planting some this year (never got to it last).


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:23 pm 
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Congrats on the success, I had read the same passage in the paper or OG magazine and even though I had been planting straight in the ground a few years it did give me pause.

If I can offer one piece of advice from 5 seasons of growing. The sooner you get your cloves in the ground in the fall the better the crop is the next year. I believe giving the bulbs a chance to grow strong root systems before the ground and air grows cold works best for me.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 7:45 am 
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Thanks for the tip! The late start was my fault. I had the cloves since late summer. This year they will go in earlyier!!

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 8:34 pm 
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NiftyNabber --

Here are a few shots of my 2009 garlic crop. I generally pull out of the ground in early June.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:15 am 
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Nice!! Looks like I'm on the right track, mine aren't quite that far along, but are looking good!

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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 8:26 am 
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My garlick, as of this morning.....


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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 8:28 am 
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And another!!


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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 11:12 am 
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You both have nice looking garlic patches.


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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 11:30 pm 
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You all are making me hungry for a big pot of home made spagetti & meatballs! Yumm, yummm!!!!!

Robert

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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 7:28 am 
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LOL I should have plenty to go around!! I don't know what I was thinking, I have 65 plants!! I guess I'll have to use Garlic on everything!

I was re-reading my 1st post in this thread, I had forgotten how wacky those instruction were!!

What a waste of 140 proof Vodka!!

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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2009 3:07 pm 
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I've got german hardneck porcelain and the standard issue store garlic growing (planted cloves that sprouted 2 years ago). Hardneck's only increase by around 4-6x each year, I got two heads for seed and they only yielded 8 cloves to plant - each clove was the size of my thumb though, so it'd be easy to use a lot of it. Peeling small cloves is the main thing that keeps me from using fresh garlic more often (as opposed to the bin of powdered garlic), I'm hoping that growing large cloved varieties will get the garlic used more.

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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2009 7:59 pm 
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I have a Zyliss garlic press that you can put the cloves in without peeling them, works great on those little guys. We use a lot of garlic.


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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2009 11:33 am 
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Here's my garlic, looks like the softneck is ready (flopped over on the right), the hardneck is on the left and has just started to put up flower scapes. There are only 8 hardneck plants since the two seed heads only had 4 cloves each. I guess if I did a good job this winter I'll have 32 cloves... ;)
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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2009 12:25 am 
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I dug up the softneck garlic today after work.
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Some of it was from last year, some was from garlic that started sprouting in the kitchen last fall. The middle part of the heads had very little cloves so I planted them together to see what would happen:
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Each little clove grew into a single large clove, but they're in an open head more like shallots. These actually look like they'd make great seed material next fall since they're quite large single cloves.

All and all, the garlic patch did MUCH better than it did last year:
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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2009 9:46 pm 
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OK, I now have "buldils" or "sprigs"?! When do I cut them off? How long do I cut it, at the buldil or closer to the plant?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2009 3:02 pm 
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I've heard they're good to eat too... I think I read somewhere to give them 2 weeks before removing them for the best bulb size. I left mine so I'd get bulblets for seed, otherwise at 4 cloves/head it'd take a couple years to scale up the porcelain garlic.

I braided the garlic in the above photo 3 days after up-rooting them.
Image
It was fast and easy. Unfortunately according to DW "They're dirty!" so they can't hang in the kitchen or pantry. :cry:

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2009 3:41 pm 
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That's a nice bunch of garlic and a good braiding job. I need to get my soil in better shape to start growing some again since it has been far too long since I last grew it. We eat enough of it through the year.

Enjoy it!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:52 pm 
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Ok, I got some good news, and some bad news. The good news, I pulled all my garlic today. The bad news, some was rotting!!?? This is my 1st time around with Garlic, so I guessing here. I thought I'd pull one just to see how it was growing, it was rotten, a mushie light brown color. The leaves had only recently started to brown or yellow.

I'm guessing the unseasonably cooler weather (about 10 degrees below the norm for May n June) and the fact it's rained 15 out of 21 days, (5" in the last week alone, 2" last night!!) for the early degeneration. Am I right?

Anyway, I did get some nice garlic though. Now I'm glad I planted 65 cloves!!

See the pictures. One is of the rotten Garlic. Another is of the good ones. And one for size reference.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 8:27 pm 
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NiftyNabber wrote:
This is my 1st time around with Garlic, so I guessing here. I thought I'd pull one just to see how it was growing, it was rotten, a mushie light brown color. The leaves had only recently started to brown or yellow.
.

You say the leaves were turning yellow, but in the photos they're still bright green!
I never pull my garlic till the leaves are dry to the touch and really brown, end of July early August.Otherwise you're pulling 'unripe' garlic which might be difficult to store.
I know you found some which looked 'rotting' and you might be right due to all the rain, but 'mature' garlic is important for storage.
Patience is a virtue! :P


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 6:54 am 
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Oh I'm sure I pulled it way too early, BeeMan, but what were my choices? I only cut the scapes 2 weeks ago. I really hate it that I lost a month or more of growing time.

I agree storage is gonna be hard, for the reason you mentioned and I just hope the rotting is stopped.

Since they were pulled early, do you think they'll grow if I plant any of the cloves?

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 11:06 am 
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You certainly pulled much too early, but like split milk, don't cry over it. Next year will be better. That's the gardeners motto.
You can dry those cloves in a dark place but with plenty of air movement. When dry separate the individual cloves, plant them 2-3 inches deep in well tilled, amended soil around mid October.
Next year remove the scapes, let them continue growing till the leaves are dark brown and crisp. Then harvest and repeat, from step one.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 11:29 am 
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They look green enough you could eat the greens now and make some lemonade from the lemons. The heads are decent sized, so you aught to get a fair amount - but the wrappers on unripe garlic tend to be much thicker resulting in less clove per head than you'd expect from looking at it.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 1:23 pm 
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Believe me, I didn't want to pull them this early, but it's still raining here. Wetest June on record, 10.27" and counting, and more tonight. I figured, rather than loose the lot, I'd pull them and save what I could.

Oh well, as they say, "Wait til next year!"

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 2:03 pm 
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That's not a problem here, but the heat is. I didn't cut the scapes so I could get bulblets (though a deer did cut one scape for me), but the leaves are browning fast and I'm not sure if they'll produce bulblets before going dormant. If they were softneck garlic they'd be done now from reading the leaves (half brown), but I dug one up and found thick wrappers and small cloves - not ready.
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