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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 9:58 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:05 am
Posts: 310
Location: Louisiana
Just got back from a wonderful but too-brief trip to visit family in Oregon. We drove from Portland to south of Ashland--pretty much border to border north and south. All along the freeway I watched the trees, and I really drank it up. I grew up in Washington and lived in Oregon for some time and the trees are some of my all-time favorites. I think the Douglas Fir would be on anyone's list of great trees, and then of course there's the cedars, and the pines, and I was surprised at my really visceral response to the madrones (not a good tree for a small yard, but it sure lights up the woodland strips with those bright orange trunks!) Then when we were landing back here, I looked at the trees from a different perspective. In Oregon they're all spiky and aspiring. Here they tend to be round and soft. The evergreens there are mostly coniferous, and here they're live oaks, and Magnolia grandifolia, and even the pines are rounded. Interesting I never noticed that particular difference.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 2:13 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 6:02 pm
Posts: 1630
Location: PNW
It is interesting to see the differences in the trees in other areas. I spent a summer in Missouri and it took me so long to get used to the little trees (compared to the trees I grew up with around here). Their mountains are our hills. It was nice to spend time there and see the differences. I was sure ready to get back to Oregon and see some green!
The western red cedar is my favorite NW tree. Madrones are pretty, but they need a dryer spot than we have.We have true firs, douglas firs, cedars, and bigleaf maples on our land, along with a couple of other deciduous trees. I'll miss them whenever we decide to move. We just found out the land across and to the north of us may be zoned for mixed use, so whatever goes in there will spoil it for us and other neighbors. It's a large chunk of land.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:05 am
Posts: 310
Location: Louisiana
It's really sad when 'progress' comes in and spoils so much. My mother used to be very anti-progress and I didn't agree so much, but now I'm beginning to. My daughter's new house looks out across the valley to the hills, and even the nearest neighbors' outlying sheds are barely visible. Her house in Hayward was a reasonably nice suburban two-story, but with a yard you could almost reach across from fence to house. She gardens. Now she has more than seven acres to play in, and a house with solar panels and all sorts of space, and a solarium-greenhouse, and it costs just about exactly what the one in California cost. Development hasn't reached there!
Sure know what you mean about hills here and there. When we were first house-hunting here the realtor showed us a nice area and referred to it after we left as 'on the hill'. We looked at each other in amazement--what hill? One house we had in Washington was three flights of stairs to the front door, and you had to go out the upstairs to the garage and the street behind. That was a hill! And I remember with sorrow the logging trucks with 'Paul Bunyon's toothpicks'--Douglas firs so big the truck could only carry two or three--or sometimes one! Wonder if there are any left like that anywhere.


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