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PostPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 4:57 pm 
As a board member of the International Aroid Society we've learned many people have no idea what the name "aroid" means. I would suggest you add a subheading which indicates the family Araceae includes genera including Philodendron, Anthurium, Alocasia, Colocasia, Amorphophallus and others that produce a spathe and spadix. Or at least something to that end.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 7:42 pm 
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This is absolutely not intended to be any kind of criticism, and probably just shows my overall technical ignorance, but I'm not sure what Aroids are, or any of the subdivisions you suggested. I went to Wikipedia and read about three paragraphs on Aroids and still am shaking my head. It seems to me that if is there is a "layman's term" for the category, (I understand Fruits and Vegetables as a category) that would help, but I think people who have an interest in aroids will know what they are and for the rest of us, elaborating won't help.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 5:50 pm 
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mike, that's exactly why steve (exoticrainforest) is asking for some kind of more detail...because most people don't know what the heek aroids are!!!

we've all seen them and just not known what 'family' they belong to. and it's quite a large family, to boot!

the one that you would know/be familiar with is 'peace lily'. that's a pretty common plant that's seen in many an office lobby - long, deep green leaves and white 'flowers'. if anything, that one should be listed as part of a sub-title for the aroid section - since it's a fairly common plant and, in general, one that the majority of people would be familiar with.

philodendrons are also fairly common - although, most people (until they do a bit of investigating/learning) would, on sight, just assume that they're some kind of basic vine like ivy. yes, most of the species do grow in a vining manner - they're not your basic ivy, though!

and, alocasia and/or colocasia are something else you've probably seen as well - those pretty-colored leafy things that sometimes get VERY big. one 'common' name for them is elephant ears.

wikipedia is fabulous - if you really want to learn about aroids in general and philodendron in particular, please visit steve's website. there's a ton of info there - and, the biggest plus to it all is that steve makes a point to be accurate with his info (sometimes wikipedia info is not quite up-to-date or accurate).


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 7:53 pm 
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Now I understand what they are and I have a couple. Thanks! :D


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:32 pm 
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I see what you are saying Exotic... But I tend to agree with Mike that the suggested subtitle of "Philodendron, Anthurium, Alocasia, Colocasia, Amorphophallus" isn't a whole lot clearer. Is there a more general way to describe this group of plants?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:37 pm 
I have tried five times to remove the word "swimming" in the fourth paragraph! I did not write it in the original text and it refuses to be removed! When I go to the edit portion of this thread it does not exist but it returns every time I hit submit. I do not know what kind of game the computer is playing but there is no such thing as a "swimming" flower!!


All the names I suggested are commonly collected genera (genus) found in the family Araceae (aroids). Perhaps some are not popular in Europe but in the United States and Asia they are enormously popular.

Ever hear of a "Peace Lily"? That is Spathiphyllum. Grow Pothos? That's an Epipremnum. A Flamingo Flower? That's an Anthurium. Every one is an aroid.

I can tell you the technical definition of an aroid but I promise that will confuse people even more.

Aroid is the common name for the family Araceae., a family of approximately 3300 species in 116-120 genera. An aroid is a plant that reproduces with an inflorescence including a spadix surrounded by a modified leaf known as a spathe.

The spadix is a central fleshy spike on which both sexes of imperfect flowers (single swimming, male or female), or in others perfect flowers containing both sexes, are formed.

The spathe is not a flower.



The most popular aroids found in collections include Philodendron, Anthurium, Colocasia, Alocasia, Xanthosoma, Caladium, Spathiphyllum (Peace Lily), Epipremnum (Pothos), Monstera, Dieffenbachia, Calla Lily, Amorphophallus, Syngonium, Dracontium, Rhaphidophora, Scindapsus, Typhonium, Anubias, Arum, Schismatoglottis, Spathicarpa, and others.

Most people either don't understand or don't care to understand there are close to 1000 species of Philodendron, another 1000 species of Anthurium and many other house plants they commonly grow but have next to zero understanding regarding their true nature.

I'm sorry that Wikipedia appears useless on this subject but I generally find it useless when anything technical is involved. In this case I find its definition to be relievedly accurate.

I have been asked to write for their "encyclopedia" but they want it all done for free. That is exactly why so much information on their site is, well let me put it kindly.....worthless. I can show you at least 40 posts on their board regarding aroids that are totally bogus. The author obviously wrote what "they believed" and never did one second of research in a scientific journal.

If you are interested in learning about aroids then the best site on the web is the International Aroid Society: http://www.Aroid.org

I do my best to maintain a site that is easily understood by collectors. We have over 1/2 million hits each year and the projections for this year (according to StatCounter) is closer to three quarter million hits. I receive daily hits from all over world (same source) so it is obvious there are tons of people around the world interested in this plant family. They just don't know what the name "aroid".....or worse, "Araceae" means.

This morning's hits:

Image

http://www.exoticrainforest.com/

Thus my request to try to help them along while also helping the users of this site.


Last edited by ExoticRainforest on Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:53 am, edited 19 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:44 pm 
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Why not just a sticky naming some of the common plants in this category. I just needed a couple of examples like that to understand it more and to find out I have a few.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:26 pm 
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luv2grdn wrote:
I just needed a couple of examples like that to understand it more and to find out I have a few.


and that's why the suggestion was made. most people do have at least one and aren't even aware of it - especially when the stores just mark everything as 'tropical foilage'.


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