The Garden Forums

Dig In!
It is currently Wed Apr 23, 2014 6:57 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Morina longifolia
PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 6:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:52 am
Posts: 1782
Location: UK
Here's a nice little plant that not so many people grow. It produces spikes of fragrant white flowers which turn pink when they are pollinated. Flowers are continually produced at each whorl and so the flowering is sustained for a long period over the whole length of the spike.
Image

The plant forms a clump of spiny leaves when it isn't in flower. This is three small plants that I put in this bed in the spring, only one is flowering.
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 12:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 6:02 pm
Posts: 1630
Location: PNW
Nice blooms, but the plant looks too much like the thistle I battle all the time, so I wouldn't enjoy that part and it would likely get pulled up when my dh helped out.
How tall is the flower spike?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 5:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:05 pm
Posts: 52
Location: Shropshire, UK
I have grown it for quite a while, it is one of my favourite plants. The seed is relatively expensive so i collect my own seed. it is quite painful to rub the last of the seeds out of the old flower spike, it is one prickly plant.

_________________
See my pictures at
http://flickr.com/photos/geoffhandley/
See my web page at
http://www.geoffhandley.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 5:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:36 am
Posts: 67
Location: Wa. state
I like it! Probably because it's unusual, and I'm always drawn to the obscure specimen plants. It's flowers are cute, but it does look prickely, though there's a certain beauty in those prickely leaves too... Does this plant stay put, or does it spread? It isn't bad to have a stickery plant, as an interesesting specimen, if it's not taking over.

_________________
Coralie


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 6:40 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:05 pm
Posts: 52
Location: Shropshire, UK
It does stay put. There is no way you could call it invasive, well not in our climate anyway.
I must say Shrubs n Bulbs' plant is a very fine specimum. I can see lots of smaller shoots on it. It should make a superb plant next year with lots of flowering stems.

_________________
See my pictures at
http://flickr.com/photos/geoffhandley/
See my web page at
http://www.geoffhandley.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 7:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:52 am
Posts: 1782
Location: UK
The flower spikes are about 2' tall, maybe a little bigger. The clumps will get wider but not at all aggressive. I expected it to self-seed but nothing so far, not that I'm complaining :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 6:02 pm
Posts: 1630
Location: PNW
Wow! I never would've guessed the flower spikes to be that long.
Maybe I'll get it for a future house when I don't have Canadian thistle around so much. :?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:52 am
Posts: 1782
Location: UK
I'm afraid I misjudged slightly. Measured it tonight and it is 39" from soil to the top of the spike. That's about two feet, right :oops:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 2:19 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:05 pm
Posts: 52
Location: Shropshire, UK
Mine have never self seeded and I have been visiting someone today who has loads and they don't self seed. So if you want some more you are going to have to grit your teeth and prise those seeds out by hand.
I would not sow them in autumn. I did it the first year with some that I received from a wild collection. December was mild and some thought it was spring. Following frosty weather wiped out those that had germinated. Fortunately a few waited until spring. Now i always sow in spring and get about 100% germination. Slugs also love the seedlings and make a real mess of the young leaves if you allow it.

_________________
See my pictures at
http://flickr.com/photos/geoffhandley/
See my web page at
http://www.geoffhandley.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2006 9:09 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Calgary, zone 3
Mmmmmm, I have always lusted after this plant! And grew it once here in zone 3 only to have it rot out in early spring (back in the days when I used to think I needed to mulch things). Lovely! Must try again some day.
Does it require improved drainage, with your relatively moist conditions in Britain*?
Lori

*Yes, I know that's probably a great generalization, but true compared to our relatively arid conditions.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 4:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:05 pm
Posts: 52
Location: Shropshire, UK
It has a thick fleshy root and the advice is to grow in a moist but well drained soil. I know that it does not like it too dry cause mine on the front garden has taken two years to flower and is a puny flower spike.
According to Rix and Phillips it is hardy to -15 degrees centigrade and is liable to rot in cold and damp.

_________________
See my pictures at
http://flickr.com/photos/geoffhandley/
See my web page at
http://www.geoffhandley.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:52 am
Posts: 1782
Location: UK
My soil is well-drained. The plants seem fairly drought tolerant, I don't provide supplementary water to them ever, but they definitely grow better with a good water supply.

I wouldn't have expected them to survive in Alberta but who knows. It is from the Himalayan region after all.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group Maintained by Rewired Media