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PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 8:07 pm 
Out of my 21 acres of field - which I allow to grow wild until the late fall - I dont have ONE Butterflyweed.

Lo & behold, about 20 feet down my drive, there's one lovely lonely little Butterflyweed plant in full neon orange bloom.

Some time within the next couple of weeks, this plant will be mowed down by my neighbor who maintains our little road strip, & I was wondering if it would be worth my while - & the plants - to try to transplant it onto my property, or into a container, or whatever.

It's definitely getting mowed, so it's not like I'm destroying someone elses joy. Any ideas on how best to do this?


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 11:19 pm 
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Location: Pt. Orchard, WA
Who own the property? If it's public or a granted egress, I'd say you have a right to it. If the neighbor is just going to mow it, the I don't see a problem

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 7:29 am 
The property belongs to my neighbors, & they don't care about any of the weeds growing there. I know that I'm welcome to it.

What I'm really questioning is how best to take it & replant it that will ensure it's survival. Technically the environment is the same, as the plant is practically a stone's throw from my land, but I'd still like some pointers.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 7:48 am 
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Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
They're tough to move once they start blooming. Unfortunately your best chance will by to cut it nearly to the base. It will grow back pretty quickly from buds on the lower stem and crown, so if you act soon it might bloom again late this year.

They have very large taproots, so dig wide and deep, then baby it in a pot for a while (if you have a pot that's deep enough!). They're pretty good as cut flowers, so just bring the bloom inside.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 7:53 am 
Thanks.

This particular plant isn't too tall - around 12"-18" tops. Has 2 stems, both with lovely neon orange blooms that are clustered with butterflies whenever I drive by.

We're supposed to have rain this entire weekend, so perhaps I'll give it a try tomorrow or Monday when the ground will be more thoroughly soaked. Unamended soil around here is that vicious red clay, which for the past several weeks has been the consistency of concrete.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 11:46 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2006 10:14 am
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Location: WI z4
As SB_Johnny said, they are difficult to move as a mature growing plant. In addition to being deep, the roots tend to be brittle; so handle the root-soil mass gently. Try digging a circle around the plant, and then move the remaining center root-soil mass as one undisturbed piece. A lot more work, but your chances of success will be higher.

If you are trying to move this plant as a permanent addition to your field, I would do it all in one operation. Dig the hole in the field, then dig the plant and put it in the hole in the field. Plant it slightly deeper than it was growing in it's original location. I would cut off the flower and a small portion of the stem, but I would leave most of the leaves on the plant so that it can rebuild the root system this summer. Water it well right after transplanting, but do not over water it after that.

Incidentally, if you happen to cut a root, check out the fragrance.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 9:41 pm 
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Location: zone 7a-OKC
With orange flowers, it probably is asclepias tuberosa, meaning tuberous tap root. Tap rooted plants all dislike being transplanted. So, to minimize the shock, I agree with both SB_Johnny and NEWisc. Dig as far away from the plant root ball as you can, and dig as deep as you can so as to disturb the roots as little as possible.

A. tuberosa doesn't like as much water as A. incarnata (aka swamp milkweed, name indicating its love of water). The tuberous roots store a lot of water. Nevertheless, I would water it in well, and if you have anything to lessen the transplant shock, that might be helpful as well.

Give it pretty much the same conditions its growing in now and it should recover, but don't be surprised it if whines for awhile.

Meanwhile, if you don't have any milkweed right now, you might try finding some seeds of Asclepias curassavica to sow in your field as annuals. Depending on where you live, they may reseed. Also, find out what milkweeds are native in your area and locate a source that sells the native plants.
A. verticillata is native in Oklahoma, so I have planted some of that. It seems the Monarchs prefer whatever is regionally native.

Susan


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 7:23 am 
I do have Swamp Milkweed growing in a few spots in the field, & really like that plant as well. I'm surprised that I have the Swamp Milkweed in the field yet none of the Butterfly Weed, because it's certainly dry as a bone.

There was a really nice specimen of the Swamp Milkweed that had been coming up for several years along the woods edge behind my barn, but I don't see it this year. I wonder if perhaps it's expended its natural lifespan.

There's one spot in the west field that has a small marshy area near a stream, & at the end of summer it's filled with absolutely gorgeous dark purple Ironweed - another favorite native of mine.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:32 am 
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Location: zone 7a-OKC
Oh, I love vernonia (Ironweed) - a gorgeous native plant. That's on my list for next year for sure!

I had A. incarnata for a few years, too, and it pooped out on me as well. I wonder if these are just short-lived perennials? Hmmmmm.

I went out today to spray oleander aphids off my tropical milkweed (A. Curassavica), A. verticillata, and my milkweed vine (honeyvine).

All of my sennas are getting big and gorgeous, and I'm just waiting for the sulphur butterflies to claim them as their breeding ground! I have 3 types. One is a native - Partridge Pea. The other two are tropicals, bicapsilaris and alata. The alata has the biggest foliage I've seen so far, just waiting for a munching butterfly.

Susan


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 3:37 pm 
Well, now we're in the midst of a major major rain/flood situation, with more rain predicted for the rest of the week, so I'm sure within a couple of days this will make my "rescue" much easier as far as being able to dig wide & deep enough. :)


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:38 am 
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Location: zone 7a-OKC
Yes, I've been watching the rain/flood situation on the eastern seaboard and inland. You all be careful there and we're thinking about you! Indeed, it should make the extraction much easier.

Susan


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 Post subject: moving butterfly weed
PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:27 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:20 am
Posts: 16
Location: Auburn, AL
If you can find a plant past flowering and collect seeds from the follicle, that is the best way to acquire this milkweed. I have grown about a thousand the last few years and the seeds are very dependable with some prior refrigeration to vernalize them.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 12:32 pm 
Thanks everyone for all the great advice. I really appreciate it.

And Carex, I have looked for other plants all over this immediate area (including my own 21 acres) & for whatever reason this little lone roadside soldier seems to be the only one - which is why I'd love to save it/move it onto my property so it can "go forth, be fruitful, & multiply" - lol!!

Chances are better than excellent that it will get mowed down long before it sets seed. Otherwise I'd just leave it where it is.


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 Post subject: asclepsias tuberosa
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 3:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:20 am
Posts: 16
Location: Auburn, AL
Send me an address To dalrylw@auburn.edu and I will send you one or ever how many you'd like next spring when I start them again as I have given away all I have this year.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 3:28 pm 
Well aren't you a peach!!! Address sent.

I do make an effort to leave a goodly portion of our property "wild", because I so enjoy the flora & fauna. This particular plant really struck me with it's beauty & the attention it's getting from butterflies. I so wish there were more of them around, but it looks like this one must have been "planted" by a passing bird traveling from another part of the neighborhood.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:37 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:20 am
Posts: 16
Location: Auburn, AL
Somehow I didn't get your email so please send it again as I have some growing and can send a couple soon.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:43 pm 
Done, with thanks!!

So far the neighbors haven't yet mown down the one along our drive, but it hasn't set seed yet.

Recently I have noticed a few plants along our local highways & byways, but never in an area where it would be safe to pull over, & even then I don't like absconding with wild plants unless I know I have permission.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:24 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:20 am
Posts: 16
Location: Auburn, AL
Breezy, Something is haywire as I have failed to recieve either e-mail. Let's try again as I have some more nice plants growing and I can send now. Try larrydalrymple@sprint.com and maybe I'll get it.
:D


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:46 pm 
Again - many thanks!!! I just sent my address to the new e-mail address you listed.

And oh goodness - why didn't I think of this before - just sent you my address via this site's Private Message feature!!


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 Post subject: How many would you like?
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2006 4:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:20 am
Posts: 16
Location: Auburn, AL
Have several so how many would you like?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2006 4:25 pm 
Carex - whatever suits you to part with conveniently. And please do understand that I will, of course, reimburse you for whatever the postage costs you!!! :)


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 Post subject: butterfly weeds
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 4:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:20 am
Posts: 16
Location: Auburn, AL
It is now Dec.7,2006 and I haven't heard how the plants I sent you turned out. Hope the result was good .


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 4:38 pm 
Carex - I sent you several personal messages & e-mails via this website several months ago, thanking you profusely for the plants & telling you how fabulous they were, & never heard a word back from you.

I potted them up in extra-large nursery pots & they're doing great. I have them in with other seedlings that require winter protection, & I'm sure the group of them will do great. I plan to plant them out this coming spring.

I'm sorry that for whatever reason you never received my e-mails - I did send several.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 4:11 pm 
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Difficult for them to move once they start blooming. Unfortunately, your best chance will be to cut it close to the base. It will soon grow back from buds on the stem under the crown, so if you act quickly, it may bloom again later in the year.

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