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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 10:46 pm 
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Location: Tucson, Arizona
About 6 of these popped open today and the best ID I could come up with is Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy) .
I did spread some wildflower seeds last fall and it could have been in the mix. What is it doing in a SW desert mix if that is what it is?
Image
Image
Thanks for any input,
Ed

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"Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better."
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ArizonaEd--Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society-- www.tucsoncactus.org


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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 11:02 pm 
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sure is purdy!! :D


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 2:24 pm 
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Hi Ed. Well, I imagine it's because it isn't nudicaule. Looks more like rhoeas, to me.
Thompson & Morgan puts out a nice cv. with a blend of colors, some quite double. I got a pkt free, which I think was called 'Angels Choir', when I purchased two other pkts.
Yes, they're best planted in the autumn, to grow through the winter, in milder climates.
The Iceland Poppy has an actual rosette of leaves & the flower arises on a stem, from the base. I think those grow wild, in the Rocky Mountains, don't they?
The smallest, are like alpinum types, which grow way up North, in Alaska.
But don't ask me how the alpinum types in North America, are related to the alpinum types in the real Alps, of Europe! :?
Shawn


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 3:28 pm 
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Thanks Shawn,
Would you have an image of both so I could compare the two and get in my ming the differences?
Thanks again,
Ed

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"Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better."
Albert Einstein (1879-1955)
ArizonaEd--Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society-- www.tucsoncactus.org


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 4:59 pm 
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Hi Ed. At the moment, I'm re-charging my battery as it''s getting old. Well you know what I mean... I'm getting older too, but I only need the occasional recharging. :lol:
It's the one for the camera!
Yeah, there is Iceland outside. Seedlings, side by side of rhoeas & nudicaule, or mature plant of Iceland?
Because the 'Angels Choir' finished & dried up- so I threw it out!
Uhm, there is setigerum, though. Which differs from somniferum, by chromosome numbers & I guess doesn't have morphine?
I guess that's what it is. 'Cause the flower stem has seti- hairs on it, like yours above.
Although the leaves look more like somniferum, yet the capsule is more like rhoeas.
While the Iceland has sparse hair on the leaf, but not as fine or as much as, or at all sometimes, on the mature leaf.
When compared to rhoeas, you show above.
Iceland only gets about a foot tall & doesn't like summer heat. So it is basically treated as a cool season annual, here.
I don't think it has a flower on it at the moment.
But nudicaule, even has hairs on the capsule.
So don't ask me what is nude about it! :?
I'll be back later, to show you...
Shawn


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 5:29 pm 
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OK Ed. Here is an Iceland (P. nudicaule) that is next to E horizonthalonius, so you have some idea of the plants size.
ShawnImage


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 9:48 pm 
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Thanks Shawn,
I need to do a little reading up on the Poppy. It sounds interesting and complicated.
Ed

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"Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better."
Albert Einstein (1879-1955)
ArizonaEd--Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society-- www.tucsoncactus.org


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 10:11 pm 
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Hi Ed. Not really complicated... But maybe it just comes a bit more easily to me, as I've grown many kinds through the years.
I just find them to be interesting, as some are involved greatly in history & medicine.
A good website that offers/ed a great variety, plus many photos with a few notes about each, is Annie's Annuals, in California. I haven't bought anything from her, as the postage starts out at about $30.!
So mail ordering just one plant becomes outrageously overpriced. :roll:
But you can check it out. I think next, I'll sow commutatum, as its supposedly heat tolerant, like the cv. 'Falling in Love', which rather surprisingly to me, didn't even germinate until it got wamer.
BTW I think one of the alpinum sorts (alboroseum?) from Alaska, has a common name of Portage Poppy, because that's the place name, of where it is from.
Bye, Shawn


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