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PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 6:09 pm
Posts: 74
Location: Columbus,ohio
Since any sunny part in my yard goes to the yard is for the pumpkin patch and the dogs gotta go to the bathroom someplace somewhere I plan on making a raised bed in a un-used part of my driveway. I plan on getting some cinder blocks for free off of craigslist. Any how here on my questions.

1. Can it do Ok on concrete?

2.How deep should the bed be?

3.What shoud be put in the bed?

4. Will drnage or to much dranage be a problem?(keeping it moist)

5. Jbest do you have any picture of your tater tower?

6. Did it work?

7. Spacing for plants?

8. has anyone had luck with planting herb or flowers in sides of cinder blocks?

9.What do people mean when they say "square"? for expample 6 squares of maters

10. Last one. What does "SFG" stand for


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2009 9:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2006 6:02 pm
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Location: PNW
Number 10 is 'square foot gardening'. As for the rest, I don't know. How about using those large nursery pots instead (I'm guessing 25 gallon size or more)? That way if you needed that part of your driveway, you could move them aside. I use a couple of them when I want to grow something that needs more warmth or just as a place to grow things without moles doing their damage. I know of a woman who has a big chunk of her driveway devoted to potted plants; shrubs, roses, small trees, etc. and it works well except for all the watering. I told her she should get a drip system to make it easier. She's in her upper 80s.

If you were to make a bed, I'd think you'd need a slightly sloped driveway to allow water to drain off.

Maybe someone who has done it will chime in.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2007 9:43 am
Posts: 280
Location: Zone 5B Pennsylvania
Hi, giant pumpkin peep and welcome to SFGing. I will try to answer the questions that I can.
1. and 2. Many people claim success on concrete but I would go two blocks high (16”) particularly if you plan to grow root crops.
3. I use 100% homemade compost; it has worked great for me. Some disagree though.
4. I never heard anybody complain of not enough drainage.
5. and 6. This spring will be my first attempt at tater towers. I will let you know.
7. I do not go by the book on SFG. I use the plant spacing on the seed pack in both directions.
8. I used wood.
9. One square foot.
10. Square Foot Gardening.

John

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My Web Page: http://www.jbest123.com


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 4:56 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 10:08 pm
Posts: 221
Location: Zone 5
I have a small triangular planter on top of my driveway made with large stones standing on edge and another smaller planter sitting on concrete that is made from a single concrete block meant for a chimney flue liner. One is about 12 inches deep and the other about 6 inches. Neither of them have a problem with drainage as the water will run right out the bottom. Too much drainage would likely be more of a problem if your soil is allowed to get too dry as the water will run down the side of the blocks and out the bottom before the soil can absorb any.

Both of these are for ornamental purposes and are in full shade. They produce beautifully when planted with shade annuals mixed with a couple of tough perennials.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2009 3:43 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 1:57 pm
Posts: 25
Location: NYC- zone 6/ Shohola PA-5
Here is a link to a similar post that may help you out.

Peter


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2009 4:18 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 9:47 pm
Posts: 197
Location: West Tennessee, Zone 7
Peter, somehow your link didn't come through! :)

Robert

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2009 4:18 pm 
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Location: Zone 5B Pennsylvania
Hello Peter, I use to have a trailer setup at Silver Canoe campground and own two farms near Dayton, PA. I currently live in zip 15068; I would say that we are almost next-door neighbors.

John

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:34 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 1:57 pm
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Location: NYC- zone 6/ Shohola PA-5
Sorry I don't know what happened to the link. here it is again. I think this was the one I was thinking about, but I am not sure. viewtopic.php?f=82&t=8813

John, I looked up where you are on a map and we are actually300 miles apart. I spend my summer in Shohola PA. We are about fifteen miles from Port Jervis NY and about the same distance to the NJ- PA border. How are the deer, near you?

Pete


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 10:18 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 6:09 pm
Posts: 74
Location: Columbus,ohio
I got another ?. We a entertament center we want to get rid of. Then I thought gee I could use it as a raised bed. It is 18 inches deep if it where tipped over. After that the roots couldn't fo any farther,sice it would have to go on concrete. could this work?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 12:03 pm 
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Location: PNW
Unless it's made of cedar, which it most likely isn't, it will rot out faster.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:35 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 6:09 pm
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Location: Columbus,ohio
It is treated. Just need it for this year. Wa thinkingof putting some 4x4's under it to make it 4 inches taller. is 24 icnehs enough for roots?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 12:27 am 
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Location: Sunol, CA (9B)
24" should be deep enough. Probably need some hardware to hold the beams together against 24" of soil pressure though. Get galvanized framing fasteners and use those to secure the corners of your box so it doesn't fall apart. The garden at my son's school did 24" raised beds with 6" deck screws and treated wood, and the screws pulled out in 1 year.

I just built some raised beds and stapled plastic on the inside of the wood so the wood stays dry. Partly to extend it's life and partly to keep water from seeping out at the seams considering I'm in an arid climate.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 1:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2007 5:02 pm
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Location: philly
how heavy a gauge of plastic??

different question about raised beds...

doing them over soil, how high should they be?? i'm looking at doing a patch specifically for vegy's and herbs. won't be very large as my yard is narrow to begin with and i've got a good-sized flowerbed that runs the length of the one side of it. don't think it would be wise to run it completely up the other side either (would be less grass to cut, though, lol)...it would just look funky.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 2:52 pm 
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Location: Sunol, CA (9B)
It was 4 mil plastic. About a foot extended beyond the bottom of the beds so I spread it out into the aisles between them on the ground to deter weeds and reduce water loss in the soil. I stapled the same black plastic over the top of the bed and plant tomatoes and peppers through holes in the plastic. That conserves water too, and increases the warmth of the soil and air around the plants.
Image
Image
Image

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:33 am 
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Location: Columbus,ohio
I must say the did pretty good. The one problem was supporting the tomatos because there where so many fruit on the plants. Then our little rat friends decided to help us and they ate every last tomato. The peppers are still doing well.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2011 3:15 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 1:30 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Puyallup, Washington
I think most of the questions posed by "giant pumpkin peep" have been answered. However, I would also recommend the use of planters (e.g. fiberglass planters, terra cotta planters, etc.) as a method of growing vegetables such as peppers and tomatoes. Containers would work well on a hard surface such as concrete and the planters can be moved as necessary to take advantage of sunlight, shade, etc.


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